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Extremophiles

, 15:565 | Cite as

Characterization of Halanaerocella petrolearia gen. nov., sp. nov., a new anaerobic moderately halophilic fermentative bacterium isolated from a deep subsurface hypersaline oil reservoir

New taxa: Firmicutes (Class Clostridia, Order Halanaerobiales, Halobacteroidaceae, Halobacteroides)
  • G. Gales
  • N. Chehider
  • C. Joulian
  • F. Battaglia-Brunet
  • J.-L. Cayol
  • A. Postec
  • J. Borgomano
  • I. Neria-Gonzalez
  • B. P. Lomans
  • B. Ollivier
  • D. Alazard
Original Paper

Abstract

An anaerobic, halophilic, and fermentative bacterium, strain S200T, was isolated from a core sample of a deep hypersaline oil reservoir. Cells were rod-shaped, non-motile, and stained Gram-positive. It grew at NaCl concentrations ranging from 6 to 26% (w/v), with optimal growth at 15% (w/v) NaCl, and at temperatures between 25 and 47°C with an optimum at 40–45°C. The optimum pH was 7.3 (range 6.2–8.8; no growth at pH 5.8 and pH 9). The doubling time in optimized growth conditions was 3.5 h. Strain S200T used exclusively carbohydrates as carbon and energy sources. The end products of glucose degradation were lactate, formate, ethanol, acetate, H2, and CO2. The predominant cellular fatty acids were non-branched fatty acids C16:1, C16:0, and C14:0. The G + C mole% of the DNA was 32.7%. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain S200T formed a distinct lineage within the family Halobacteroidaceae, order Halanaerobiales, and was most closely related to Halanaerobaculum tunisiense DSM 19997T and Halobacteroides halobius DSM 5150T, with sequence similarity of 92.3 and 91.9%, respectively. On the basis of its physiological and genotypic properties, strain S200T is proposed to be assigned to a novel species of a novel genus, for which the name Halanaerocella petrolearia is proposed. The type strain of Halanaerocella petrolearia is strain S200T (=DSM 22693T = JCM 16358T).

Keywords

Anaerobic Halophilic Taxonomy Halanaerocella petrolearia Oil reservoir 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank the SHELL petroleum company for its financial support, Prof. Jean Euzéby for his suggestion on Latin nomenclature for the novel microorganism, and Dr. Marie-Laure Fardeau for HPLC analysis.

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Copyright information

© Springer 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Gales
    • 1
  • N. Chehider
    • 2
  • C. Joulian
    • 3
  • F. Battaglia-Brunet
    • 3
  • J.-L. Cayol
    • 2
  • A. Postec
    • 2
  • J. Borgomano
    • 1
  • I. Neria-Gonzalez
    • 2
  • B. P. Lomans
    • 4
  • B. Ollivier
    • 2
  • D. Alazard
    • 2
  1. 1.Université de Provence, Laboratoire de Géologie des Systèmes et des Réservoirs CarbonatésMarseille Cedex 03France
  2. 2.Laboratoire de Microbiologie IRD, UMR 180, Universités de Provence et de la MéditerranéeMarseille Cedex 9France
  3. 3.BRGM, Unité EcotechnologiesOrléans Cedex 2France
  4. 4.Emerging Technologies—Subsurface, Projects & Technologies, Shell International Exploration and Production B.VRijswijkThe Netherlands

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