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Clinical Oral Investigations

, Volume 8, Issue 2, pp 70–74 | Cite as

Healing of human intrabony defects following regenerative periodontal therapy with a bovine-derived xenograft and guided tissue regeneration

  • A. SculeanEmail author
  • A. Stavropoulos
  • P. Windisch
  • T. Keglevich
  • T. Karring
  • I. Gera
Original Article

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to histologically evaluate the healing of human intrabony defects following treatment with either a bovine-derived xenograft (BDX) and guided tissue regeneration (GTR) [BDX + GTR] or a bovine-derived xenograft mixed with collagen (BDX Coll) and GTR [BDX Coll + GTR]. Eight patients with chronic periodontitis and each with one very deep intrabony defect around a tooth scheduled for extraction were treated with either a combination of BDX + GTR (five patients) or with BDX Coll + GTR (three patients). The postoperative healing was uneventful in all eight cases. After a healing period of 6 months, the teeth or roots were extracted together with some of their surrounding soft and hard tissues and subsequently fixed in 10% buffered formalin. Following decalcification in EDTA, the specimens were embedded in paraffin and 8-µm histological sections were cut in the mesio-distal direction, parallel to the long axes of the teeth. The sections were alternatively stained with hematoxylin and eosin, van Giesson’s connective tissue stain or with the Ladevig’s connective tissue staining method and examined under the light microscope. Generally, formation of new cementum with inserting collagen fibers was found in seven out of the eight treated cases, whereas in the remaining case (treated with BDX + GTR) the healing was characterized by formation of a long junctional epithelium along the debrided root surface and no formation of cementum or bone. In the specimens demonstrating periodontal regeneration the new cementum was always of a cellular type. In most cases, the graft particles were surrounded by bone. In some areas, the bone tissue around the graft particles was connected by perpendicularly inserting collagen fibers to the newly formed cementum on the root surface. The epithelium downgrowth stopped always at the most coronal part of the newly formed cementum. No remnants of the membrane material were observed in any of the biopsies. Connective tissue encapsulation of the graft particles was rarely observed and was limited to the most coronal part of the defects. The findings of the present study provide evidence that treatment of intrabony defects with both BDX + GTR and BDX Coll + GTR may enhance periodontal regeneration in humans.

Keywords

Bovine-derived xenograft Guided tissue regeneration Human histology Regenerative periodontal treatment 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Sculean
    • 1
    Email author
  • A. Stavropoulos
    • 2
  • P. Windisch
    • 3
  • T. Keglevich
    • 3
  • T. Karring
    • 2
  • I. Gera
    • 3
  1. 1.Section of Periodontology, Department of Conservative Dentistry and PeriodontologyJohannes Gutenberg-UniversityMainzGermany
  2. 2.Department of PeriodontologyRoyal Dental CollegeAarhusDenmark
  3. 3.Department of PeriodontologySemmelweis University BudapestHungary

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