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Cross-device task interaction framework between the smart watch and the smart phone

  • Yajie Xu
  • Lu WangEmail author
  • Yanning Xu
  • Siyuan Qiu
  • Maopu Xu
  • Xiangxu MengEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

Along with the increasing emergence of smart watch devices, new interaction techniques between these devices and smart phones have been proposed to leverage their availability. However, there are few existing studies on enhancing smart watches’ current functions: working as an information processing system for users’ phones in terms of both browsing and handling short information. In this work, we introduce a framework for handling tasks between the smart phone and the smart watch, including task delegation and task management, that enables the smart watch to temporarily handle lightweight jobs from the smart phone. By utilizing this framework, people can save valuable phone screen space for more complicated or important tasks. Moreover, considering users’ multi-tasking behaviors, we also provide some example situations where users use both their phone and smart watch to handle different kinds of tasks simultaneously. The user study illustrates that lightweight jobs can be efficiently handled by users on the watch.

Keywords

Smart watch Smart phone Multi-tasking environment Task management Cross-device 

Notes

Funding information

This work has been partially supported by the National Key R&D Program of China under grant no. 2017YFB0203000, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under grant nos.61872223,61802187,61702311, the Young Scholars Program of Shandong University under grant no.2015WLJH41, the Special Funds of Taishan Scholar Construction Project.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Ltd., part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of SoftwareShandong UniversityJinanChina
  2. 2.Engineering Research Center of Digital Media Technology, Ministry of EducationJinanChina
  3. 3.New York UniversityNew YorkUSA
  4. 4.Shandong Experimental High SchoolJinanChina

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