Personal and Ubiquitous Computing

, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 239–254 | Cite as

Peripheral interaction: characteristics and considerations

Original Article

Abstract

In everyday life, we are able to perceive information and perform physical actions in the background or periphery of attention. Inspired by this observation, several researchers have studied interactive systems that display digital information in the periphery of attention. To broaden the scope of this research direction, a few recent studies have focused on interactive systems that can not only be perceived in the background but also enable users to physically interact with digital information in their periphery. Such peripheral interaction designs can support computing technology to fluently embed in and become a meaningful part of people’s everyday routines. With the increasing ubiquity of technology in our everyday environment, we believe that this direction is highly relevant nowadays. This paper presents an in-depth analysis of three case studies on peripheral interaction. These case studies involved the design and development of peripheral interactive systems and deployment of these systems in the real context of use for a number of weeks. Based on the insights gained through these case studies, we discuss generalized characteristics and considerations for peripheral interaction design and evaluation. The aim of the work presented in this paper is to support interaction design researchers and practitioners in anticipating and facilitating peripheral interaction with the designs they are evaluating or developing.

Keywords

Peripheral interaction Tangible interaction Audio Calm technology User-centered design User evaluation 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Saskia Bakker
    • 1
  • Elise van den Hoven
    • 2
    • 1
  • Berry Eggen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Industrial DesignEindhoven University of TechnologyEindhovenThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Design, Architecture and Building FacultyUniversity of TechnologySydneyAustralia

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