Personal and Ubiquitous Computing

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 265–280 | Cite as

Bearing-based selection in mobile spatial interaction

Original Article

Abstract

We introduce a mobile spatial interactive application that uses a combination of a GPS, inertial sensing, gestural interaction, probabilistic models and Monte Carlo sampling, with vibration and audio feedback. This system allows the probing or querying of targets in a local area, based on a model of the local environment and specific context variables of interest, to enable a rich, embodied and location–aware spatial interaction. An experiment was conducted to investigate how spatial target selection at different distances, target separations and target widths is affected by a system with added ‘typical’ noise characteristics. Results showed that the successful selection of targets in the virtual environment is maximised with a combination of high angular separation and angular width.

Keywords

GPS Navigation Uncertainty Monte Carlo Feedback Audio Tracking Probabilistic display Context Selection 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful for support from:SFI grants 00/PI.1/C067, 00/RFP06/CMS052, EPSRC project EP/E042740/1, IST Programme of the European Commission, under PASCAL Network of Excellence, IST 2002-506778, and OpenInterface Project. Nokia provided a donation of funds and equipment which further supported this work.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Hamilton InstituteNUI MaynoothMaynoothIreland
  2. 2.Department of Computing ScienceUniversity of GlasgowGlasgowUK

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