Personal and Ubiquitous Computing

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 134–141 | Cite as

User experience of communication before and during rendezvous: interim results

Article

Abstract

This paper reports on a diary study of rendezvousing as performed by university students. The study compares students’ experience of communication before and during rendezvous. During rendezvous, students rated several aspects of the experience of communication lower than before rendezvous. This impairment of experience is attributed to the cumulative effects of the following aspects of the context of use: noise, multiple task performance, conflict with social norms, incomplete network coverage, time pressure and conflict with preferred life paths. User performance goals for context-aware communication systems are discussed.

Keywords

User experience Mobile telephone Communication Context of use 

References

  1. 1.
    Barkhuus L, Dey A (2003) Location-based services for mobile telephony: a study of users’ privacy concerns. In: Proceedings of the 9th IFIP international conference on human–computer interaction (INTERACT 2003), Zurich, Switzerland, September 2003. ACM Press, New York, pp 709–712Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Brodie J (2003) Designing to support communication on the move. In: Proceedings of the CHI 2003 conference on human factors in computing systems, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, April 2003. ACM Press, New York, pp 908–909Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Tamminen S, Oulasvirta A, Toiskalio K, Kankainen A (2003) Understanding mobile contexts. In: Proceedings of the 5th international symposium on human–computer interaction with mobile devices and services (Mobile HCI 2003), Udine, Italy, September 2003. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New YorkGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Kim H, Kim J, Lee Y, Chae M, Choi Y (2002) An empirical study of the use contexts and usability problems in mobile internet. In: Proceedings of the 35th Hawaii international conference on system sciences (HICSS-35), Big Island, Hawaii, January 2002Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Perry M, O’Hara K, Sellen A, Brown B, Harper R (2001) Dealing with mobility: understanding access anytime, anywhere. ACM Trans Comput–Hum Interact 8(4):323–347CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Wiberg M, Ljungberg F (2000) Exploring the vision of anytime, anywhere in the context of mobile work. In: Knowledge management and virtual organizations: theories, practices, technologies and methods. The Biztech Network, Brint Press, LondonGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Kaasinen E (2003) User needs for location-aware mobile services. Pers Ubiquit Comput 7(1):70–79Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Mikkonen M, Väyrynen S, Ikonen V, Heikkilä MO (2002) User and concept studies as tools in developing mobile communication services for the elderly. Pers Ubiquit Comput 6(2):113–114CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Fithian R, Iachello G, Moghazy J, Pousman Z (2003) The design and evaluation of a mobile location-aware handheld event planner. In: Proceedings of the 5th international symposium on human–computer interaction with mobile devices and services (Mobile HCI 2003), Udine, Italy, September 2003. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, pp 145–160Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Newman WM, Taylor A (1999) Towards a methodology employing critical parameters to deliver performance improvements in interactive systems. In: Proceedings of the 7th IFIP international conference on human–computer interaction (INTERACT’99), Edinburgh, Scotland, September 1999. IOS Press, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, pp 605–612Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Schmidt A, Beigl M, Gellersen HW (1999) There is more to context than location. Comput Graph 23(6):893–901CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Russell DM, Weiser M (1998) The future of integrated design of ubiquitous computing in combined real and virtual worlds. In: Proceedings of the CHI’98 conference on human factors in computing systems, Los Angeles, California, April 1998. ACM Press, New York, pp 275–276Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Fleming J (1998) Web navigation: designing the user experience. O’Reilly, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Wikstrand G (2003) Improving user comprehension and entertainment in wireless streaming media. Department of Computer Science, Umea University, Umea, SwedenGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Prabhu GV, del Galdo EM (1999) Designing for global markets. Backhouse Press, Rochester, New YorkGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Ranganathan A, Lei H (2003) Using context information to improve human communication. IEEE Comput 36(4):90–92Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Schilit BN, Hilbert DM, Trevor J (2002) Context-aware communication. IEEE Wireless Commun 9(5):46–54CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Colbert M (2004) Usage and user experience of communication before and during rendezvous: implications for wireless services (submitted)Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    Kurvinen E, Oulasvirta A (2003) Towards social-awareness in ubiquitous computing: a turntaking approach. HIIT technical report 2003-1, Helsinki Institute for Information Technology, Finland, available at http://www.hiit.fi/publications/pub_files/hiit2003-1.pdf
  20. 21.
    Kjeldskov J, Skov MB, Als BS, Høegh RT (2004) Is it worth the hassle? Exploring the added value of evaluating the usability of context-aware mobile systems in the field. In: Proceedings of the 6th international conference on human–computer interaction with mobile devices and services (Mobile HCI 2004), Glasgow, Scotland, September 2004Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    Colbert M (2001) A diary study of rendezvousing: implications for position-aware communication for mobile groups. In: Proceedings of the international conference on supporting group work (GROUP 2001), Boulder, Colorado, September/October 2001. ACM Press, New York, pp 15–23Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Colbert M (2002) A diary study of rendezvousing: performance deficits, task pacing, large groups and position-aware communication. In: Proceedings of the 4th international symposium on human–computer interaction with mobile devices (Mobile HCI 2002), Pisa, Italy, September 2002. Springer, Berlin Heidelberg New York, pp 21–35Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    Hudson SE, Fogarty J, Atkeson CG, Avrahami D, Forlizzi J, Kiesler S, Lee JC, Yang J (2003) Predicting human interruptibility with sensors: a Wizard of Oz feasibility study. In: Proceedings of the CHI 2003 conference on human factors in computing systems, Fort Lauderdale, California, April 2003. ACM Press, New York, pp 275–276Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Computing and Information SystemsKingston UniversityLondonUK

Personalised recommendations