Personal and Ubiquitous Computing

, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp 20–31 | Cite as

On location models for ubiquitous computing

Original Article

Abstract

Common queries regarding information processing in ubiquitous computing are based on the location of physical objects. No matter whether it is the next printer, next restaurant, or a friend is searched for, a notion of distances between objects is required. A search for all objects in a certain geographic area requires the possibility to define spatial ranges and spatial inclusion of locations. In this paper, we discuss general properties of symbolic and geometric coordinates. Based on that, we present an overview of existing location models allowing for position, range, and nearest neighbor queries. The location models are classified according to their suitability with respect to the query processing and the involved modeling effort along with other requirements. Besides an overview of existing location models and approaches, the classification of location models with respect to application requirements can assist developers in their design decisions.

Keywords

Location model Ubiquitous computing Context-awareness Location-based services 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag London Limited 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Parallel and Distributed Systems (IPVS)University of StuttgartStuttgartGermany

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