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Journal of Orthopaedic Science

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 317–320 | Cite as

Diet and lifestyle associated with increased bone mineral density: cross-sectional study of Japanese elderly women at an osteoporosis outpatient clinic

  • Shigeyuki Muraki
  • Seizo Yamamoto
  • Hideaki Ishibashi
  • Hiroyuki Oka
  • Noriko Yoshimura
  • Hiroshi Kawaguchi
  • Kozo Nakamura
Original article

Abstract

Background

Several studies have already demonstrated that lifestyle characteristics, such as physical activity, smoking, and alcohol intake, are associated with bone mineral density (BMD). Coffee intake was shown to be negatively associated with BMD, whereas tea drinking was reported to be associated with increased BMD. A review of the literature, however, revealed that few studies have described the association between BMD and lifestyle, including characteristic Japanese foods such as fish, natto, and Japanese green tea. The aim of this study was to identify lifestyle factors associated with BMD.

Methods

A total of 632 women age ≥60 years were enrolled in this study. Subjects were interviewed about their lifestyle by means of a questionnaire regarding the consumption pattern of dietary items. BMD was measured at the lumbar spine by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry.

Results

The BMD was higher in subjects with the habits of alcohol drinking, green tea drinking, and physical activity and lower in those with the habits of smoking and cheese consumption. Multiple regression analysis showed that factors associated with BMD were smoking, alcohol consumption, green tea drinking, and physical activity after adjusting for age and body mass index (BMI).

Conclusions

In this cross-sectional study at an osteoporosis outpatient clinic, patients with the habits of alcohol drinking, green tea drinking, and physical activity had significantly higher BMD, and those who smoked had significantly lower BMD than patients without each habit after adjusting for age, BMI, and other variables regarding lifestyle.

Keywords

Bone Mineral Density Lumbar Spine Bone Mineral Density High Bone Mineral Density Coffee Intake Degenerative Spinal Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Orthopaedic Association 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shigeyuki Muraki
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Seizo Yamamoto
    • 2
  • Hideaki Ishibashi
    • 2
  • Hiroyuki Oka
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Noriko Yoshimura
    • 4
  • Hiroshi Kawaguchi
    • 3
  • Kozo Nakamura
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Motor System Medicine22nd Medical and Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, University of TokyoTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of Orthopedic SurgeryTokyo Metropolitan Geriatric Medical CenterTokyoJapan
  3. 3.Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of TokyoTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Department of Joint Disease Research22nd Medical and Research Center, Faculty of Medicine, University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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