Journal of Bone and Mineral Metabolism

, Volume 28, Issue 4, pp 446–450

Cooperative effect of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and a polymorphism of transforming growth factor-β1 gene on the prevalence of vertebral fractures in postmenopausal osteoporosis

  • Seijiro Mori
  • Noriyuki Fuku
  • Yuko Chiba
  • Fumiaki Tokimura
  • Takayuki Hosoi
  • Yoshiyuki Kimbara
  • Yoshiaki Tamura
  • Atsushi Araki
  • Masashi Tanaka
  • Hideki Ito
Original Article

Abstract

A T869→C polymorphism of the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) gene is reported to be associated with genetic susceptibility to both osteoporosis and vertebral fractures. A low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] level is known to be associated with a higher risk for hip fracture. This study aimed to assess a possible cooperative effect of the gene polymorphism and vitamin D status on vertebral fracture risk. The prevalence of vertebral fracture in 168 postmenopausal female patients with osteoporosis was analyzed, and its association with the TGF-β1 gene polymorphism and serum 25(OH)D concentration was assessed cross-sectionally. The fracture prevalence increased according to the rank order of the TGF-β1 genotypes CC < CT < TT, as expected. A significant difference was found not only between the CC and TT genotypes (P = 0.005) but also between the CC and CT genotypes (P < 0.05) when the patients with serum 25(OH)D of more than the median value [22 ng/ml (55 nmol/l)] were analyzed. On the other hand, when those with serum 25(OH)D of less than the median value were analyzed, the protective effect of the C allele against the fracture was blunted; statistical significance in the difference of the fracture prevalence was lost between the CC genotype and the other genotypes. These data suggest that vitamin D fulfillment is prerequisite for the TGF-β1 genotype in exerting its full effect on the fracture prevalence.

Keywords

Gene polymorphism Transforming growth factor-β Vertebral fracture Vitamin D Osteoporosis 

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Copyright information

© The Japanese Society for Bone and Mineral Research and Springer 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Seijiro Mori
    • 1
  • Noriyuki Fuku
    • 2
  • Yuko Chiba
    • 1
  • Fumiaki Tokimura
    • 1
  • Takayuki Hosoi
    • 3
  • Yoshiyuki Kimbara
    • 1
  • Yoshiaki Tamura
    • 1
  • Atsushi Araki
    • 1
  • Masashi Tanaka
    • 2
  • Hideki Ito
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineTokyo Metropolitan Geriatric HospitalTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of GerontologyTokyoJapan
  3. 3.National Center for Geriatrics and GerontologyAichiJapan

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