Journal of Marine Science and Technology

, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp 546–558 | Cite as

Energy savings for ship propulsion in waves based on real-time optimal control of propeller pitch and electric propulsion

  • Hidenari Makino
  • Naoya Umeda
  • Toshiyuki Ohtsuka
  • Shoji Ikejima
  • Hidenori Sekiguchi
  • Katsuji Tanizawa
  • Junichi Suzuki
  • Masaki Fukazawa
Original article

Abstract

To reduce greenhouse gas emissions from ships as required by international environmental regulations, we propose herein an energy-saving method for ships sailing on wavy seas. The effect of applying this method is investigated by a numerical study of a bulk carrier self-propelled in regular head and following waves. The method requires that the ship be equipped with a controllable-pitch propeller (CPP) and an electric propulsion motor, which are controlled in an optimal manner to anticipate impending waves, thereby minimizing energy consumption. Optimal control is implemented using a nonlinear model predictive control method that uses information within a receding horizon to calculate the adjustments, which in turn control actuators that vary the propeller-pitch angle and the drive frequency of the motor. To implement this real-time application, we use a fast algorithm for solving the model predictive control problem. As a result, for a wave steepness of 0.01 and a unity ratio of wavelength to ship length, the energy required to propel a bulk carrier without optimal control is reduced by about 10% with the optimal-control system proposed herein.

Keywords

Energy saving CPP Electric propulsion Real-time optimal control Receding horizon 

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Copyright information

© JASNAOE 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hidenari Makino
    • 1
  • Naoya Umeda
    • 1
  • Toshiyuki Ohtsuka
    • 2
  • Shoji Ikejima
    • 1
  • Hidenori Sekiguchi
    • 3
  • Katsuji Tanizawa
    • 3
  • Junichi Suzuki
    • 4
  • Masaki Fukazawa
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean EngineeringOsaka UniversitySuitaJapan
  2. 2.Department of Systems Science, Graduate School of InformaticsKyoto UniversityKyotoJapan
  3. 3.National Maritime Research InstituteTokyoJapan
  4. 4.Kamome Propeller Co., Ltd.YokohamaJapan

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