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Gender and 5-years course of psychosis patients: focus on clinical and social variables

  • Carla ComacchioEmail author
  • Antonio Lasalvia
  • Chiara Bonetto
  • Doriana Cristofalo
  • Elisabetta Miglietta
  • Sara Petterlini
  • K. De Santi
  • S. Tosato
  • R. Riolo
  • C. Cremonese
  • E. Ceccato
  • G. Zanatta
  • Mirella Ruggeri
  • the PICOS Veneto Group
Original Article

Abstract

Most studies on gender and psychosis have focused on gender differences at illness onset or on the long-term outcome, whereas little is known about the impact of gender on the first years after psychosis onset. A total of 185 first episode psychosis (FEP) patients were followed for 5 years after psychosis onset, and gender differences were explored in psychopathology (PANSS), needs for care (CAN), and insight (SAI-E). Male patients showed more negative symptoms than females over time, whereas female patients showed higher levels of depressive symptoms than males throughout the study period. In addition, female patients presented more functioning unmet needs for care, but higher levels of insight into illness than males. Therapy and rehabilitative programs for FEP patients should be gender-targeted, as gender has proved to impact on psychopathology, needs for care, and insight in the very first years following psychosis onset.

Keywords

Gender First episode psychosis FEP Psychopathology Needs Insight 

Notes

Funding

This study was supported by the Ricerca Sanitaria Finalizzata 2004, Giunta Regionale del Veneto with a grant to Prof M. Ruggeri, Ricerca Sanitaria Finalizzata 2005, Giunta Regionale del Veneto with a grant to Dr. A. Lasalvia, and by the Fondazione Cariverona, which provided a 3-year grant to the WHO Collaborating Centre for Research and Training in Mental Health and Service Organization at the University of Verona, directed by Prof M. Tansella. The grant (“Promoting research to improve quality of care. The Verona WHO Centre for mental health research”) supports the main research projects of the following Units of the Verona WHO Centre: Psychiatric Case Register, Geographical Epidemiology and Mental Health Economics (Head: Prof F. Amaddeo); Clinical Psychopharmacology & Drug Epidemiology (Head: Dr. C. Barbui); and Environmental, Clinical and Genetic Determinants of Outcome of Mental Disorders (Head: Prof M. Ruggeri).

Compliance with ethical standards

Ethical approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carla Comacchio
    • 1
    Email author
  • Antonio Lasalvia
    • 1
  • Chiara Bonetto
    • 1
  • Doriana Cristofalo
    • 1
  • Elisabetta Miglietta
    • 1
  • Sara Petterlini
    • 1
  • K. De Santi
    • 1
  • S. Tosato
    • 1
  • R. Riolo
    • 1
  • C. Cremonese
    • 1
  • E. Ceccato
    • 1
  • G. Zanatta
    • 1
  • Mirella Ruggeri
    • 1
  • the PICOS Veneto Group
  1. 1.Department Neurosciences, Biomedicine and Movement SciencesUniversity of VeronaVeronaItaly

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