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Is perinatal major depression affecting obstetrical outcomes? Commentary on “Impact of maternal depression on perinatal outcome in hospitalized women-a prospective study”

  • Massimiliano BuoliEmail author
  • Silvia Grassi
  • Martina Di Paolo
  • Marta Redaelli
  • Valentina Bollati
Letter to the Editor

Dear Editor,

We have read with great interest the paper by Hermon et al. (2019) regarding the impact of maternal depression on perinatal outcomes, wherein the authors observed the association of maternal depression with preterm delivery. We would like to congratulate the authors, although we would like to make two considerations on this study. The first is that the recruited pregnant women had medical diseases that can contribute per se to the development of antenatal depression (e.g., obesity) (Steinig et al. 2017). The second is that the authors used an Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) cutoff score < or ≥ 10. However, there is not a complete agreement about what is the most appropriate EPDS score to detect women with or without depression (O’Connor et al. 2016). EPDS is properly a tool to assess the severity of depression and not to make diagnosis of perinatal major depression (PMD), and a score > 15 indicates the risk to fulfill the criteria of PMD according to the...

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

This study was approved by the local institutional ethical review board (Comitato Etico Milano Area 2, Fondazione IRCCS Ca’Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico).

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

References

  1. Hermon N, Wainstock T, Sheiner E, Golan A, Walfisch A (2019) Impact of maternal depression on perinatal outcomes in hospitalized women—a prospective study. Arch Womens Ment Health 22(1):85–91CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  5. Serati M, Barkin JL, Orsenigo G, Altamura AC, Buoli M (2017) Research review: the role of obstetric and neonatal complications in childhood attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder - a systematic review. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 58(12):1290–1300CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Massimiliano Buoli
    • 1
    Email author
  • Silvia Grassi
    • 1
  • Martina Di Paolo
    • 1
  • Marta Redaelli
    • 1
  • Valentina Bollati
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Neurosciences and Mental HealthFondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore PoliclinicoMilanItaly
  2. 2.EPIGET-Epidemiology, Epigenetics and Toxicology Lab-Department of Clinical Sciences and Community HealthUniversity of MilanMilanItaly

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