Archives of Women's Mental Health

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 197–201

Clinical subtypes of core premenstrual disorders: a Delphi survey

  • Khaled M. K. Ismail
  • Tracy Nevatte
  • Shaughn O’Brien
  • Elena Paschetta
  • Torbjorn Bäckström
  • Lorraine Dennerstein
  • Elias Eriksson
  • Ellen W. Freeman
  • Nick Panay
  • Teri Pearlstein
  • Andrea Rapkin
  • Meir Steiner
  • John Studd
  • Inger Sundström-Poromaa
Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00737-012-0326-7

Cite this article as:
Ismail, K.M.K., Nevatte, T., O’Brien, S. et al. Arch Womens Ment Health (2013) 16: 197. doi:10.1007/s00737-012-0326-7

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to classify the clinical subtypes of core premenstrual disorders during the International Society for Premenstrual Disorders’ second consensus meeting. Multiple iterations were used to achieve consensus between a group of experts; these iterations included a two-generational Delphi technique that was preceded and followed by open group discussions. The first round was to generate a list of all potential clinical subtypes, which were subsequently prioritized using a Delphi methodology and then finalised in a final round of open discussion. On a six-point scale, 4 of the 12 potential clinical subtypes had a mean score of ≥5.0 following the second iteration and only 3 of the 4 still had a mean score of ≥5.0 after the third iteration. The final list consisted of these three subtypes and an additional subtype, which was introduced and agreed upon, in the final iteration. There is consensus amongst experts that core premenstrual disorder is divided into three symptom-based subtypes: predominantly physical, predominantly psychological and mixed. A proportion of psychological and mixed subtypes may meet the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

Keywords

Premenstrual disorder Core premenstrual disorder Premenstrual syndrome Premenstrual dysphoric disorder Delphi method 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Khaled M. K. Ismail
    • 1
    • 2
  • Tracy Nevatte
    • 3
  • Shaughn O’Brien
    • 3
  • Elena Paschetta
    • 2
  • Torbjorn Bäckström
    • 4
  • Lorraine Dennerstein
    • 5
    • 6
  • Elias Eriksson
    • 7
  • Ellen W. Freeman
    • 8
  • Nick Panay
    • 9
  • Teri Pearlstein
    • 10
  • Andrea Rapkin
    • 11
  • Meir Steiner
    • 12
    • 13
  • John Studd
    • 9
  • Inger Sundström-Poromaa
    • 14
  1. 1.School of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, College of Medical and Dental SciencesUniversity of BirminghamBirminghamUK
  2. 2.Birmingham Women’s Hospital NHS Foundation TrustBirminghamUK
  3. 3.Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Guy-Hilton Research CentreKeele UniversityKeeleUK
  4. 4.Umeå Neurosteroid Research Center, Department of Clinical SciencesUmeå UniversityUmeåSweden
  5. 5.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  6. 6.National Ageing Research InstituteParkvilleAustralia
  7. 7.Department of Neuroscience and Physiology, Sahlgrenska AcademyUniversity of GothenburgGothenburgSweden
  8. 8.Departments of Obstetrics/Gynaecology and PsychiatryUniversity of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  9. 9.Department of Obstetrics and GynaecologyChelsea and Westminster HospitalLondonUK
  10. 10.Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  11. 11.David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLALos AngelesUSA
  12. 12.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural NeurosciencesMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  13. 13.Department of Obstetrics and GynecologyMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada
  14. 14.Department of Women’s and Children’s HealthUppsala UniversityUppsalaSweden

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