Archives of Women's Mental Health

, Volume 15, Issue 2, pp 131–133 | Cite as

Relationship between premenstrual symptoms and dysmenorrhea in Japanese high school students

  • Mari Kitamura
  • Takashi Takeda
  • Shoko Koga
  • Satoru Nagase
  • Nobuo Yaegashi
Short Communication

Abstract

To determine the relationship between premenstrual symptoms and dysmenorrhea among Japanese adolescent girls, a total of 1,431 high school students were assessed. Of them, 11.3% were classified with “moderate to severe premenstrual syndrome (PMS)” and 3.2% with “premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).” Eighty-five percent of the girls had dysmenorrhea. The rates of prevalence of PMDD and moderate to severe PMS were increased according to the severity of dysmenorrhea (rs = 0.479), showing a correlation between the severity of PMS/PMDD and dysmenorrhea in adolescents.

Keywords

PMS PMDD Dysmenorrhea Japanese women High school students 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported, in part, by a grant from the Institute for Food and Health Science, Yazuya Co., Ltd.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mari Kitamura
    • 1
  • Takashi Takeda
    • 1
  • Shoko Koga
    • 1
  • Satoru Nagase
    • 1
  • Nobuo Yaegashi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Obstetrics & GynecologyTohoku University Graduate School of MedicineSendaiJapan

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