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Archives of Women's Mental Health

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 41–44 | Cite as

Classification of mental health disorders in the perinatal period: future directions for DSM-V and ICD-11

  • Marie-Paule AustinEmail author
Article

Perinatal psychiatry is the specialty concerned with the mental health and illness of women from conception through to the first postnatal year. By using the term “perinatal” we seek to ensure not only that maternal mental health is considered from conception onwards, but that its impact on the developing mother-infant relationship, is kept in mind by clinicians, policymakers and researchers alike.

While prevalence estimates for maternal disorder in the perinatal period are similar to that at other times in the child-bearing years, we know that the incidence of depression is higher in the first few weeks postpartum; that rates of dysphoria (measured by EPDS score) are similar in late pregnancy and the postnatal period; that up to 30–40% of depressive symptoms will have begun in pregnancy; that there is significant comorbid anxiety and depressive disorder in this population, and that prolonged depression will impact negatively on the mother-infant interaction (for overview see Austin 2004...

Keywords

Nosology Postpartum disorders Postnatal Puerperal psychosis Mood disorders 

Notes

Conflict of interest

The author declares that she has no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.St John of God Chair Perinatal and Women’s Mental HealthSt John of God Health Care & School of Psychiatry, University of New South WalesSydneyAustralia

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