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Risk factors for postpartum depression: the role of the Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory-Revised (PDPI-R)

Results from the Perinatal Depression-Research & Screening Unit (PNDReScU) study
  • A. Oppo
  • M. Mauri
  • D. Ramacciotti
  • V. Camilleri
  • S. Banti
  • C. Borri
  • C. Rambelli
  • M. S. Montagnani
  • S. Cortopassi
  • A. Bettini
  • S. Ricciardulli
  • S. Montaresi
  • P. Rucci
  • C. T. Beck
  • G. B. Cassano
Original Contribution

Abstract

The aims of this study were to identify the frequency of the risk factors for postpartum depression (PPD) listed in the Postpartum Depression Predictors Inventory-Revised (PDPI-R) during pregnancy and 1 month after delivery and to determine the predictive validity of the PDPI-R. The study used a prospective cohort design. Women completed the PDPI-R at the 3rd and the 8th months of pregnancy and at the 1st month after childbirth. Women were prospectively followed across three different time points during the postpartum using Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders to determine the presence of major or minor depression. The prenatal version of the PDPI-R administered at two different time points during pregnancy predicted accurately 72.6% and 78.2% of PPD and the full version administered at the 1st month after delivery predicted 83.4% of PPD. The cutoffs identified were 3.5 for the prenatal version and 5.5 for the full version. The PDPI-R is a useful and a valid screening tool for PPD.

Keywords

Postpartum depression Risk factors ROC analysis PDPI-R 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This research was funded with a grant from the Italian Ministry of Health and liberal grants from IDEA and Stella Major Foundations (no-profit advocacy associations) and Pfizer Italia. The PND-ReScU staff includes Drs. Banti S., Borri C., Rambelli C., Ramacciotti D., Montagnani M., Camilleri V., Cortopassi S., Bettini A., Ricciardulli S., Luisi S., Bruni J., Cianelli E., Mazzoni R., Corradini A., Cirri C., Di Biase S., Montaresi S., Casimo L., Giunti Y., Ciaponi B., and Oppo A. The authors thank Giulia Gray for editing the final version of the paper. We thank all the women who participated without whom this study would not have been possible.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Oppo
    • 1
  • M. Mauri
    • 1
  • D. Ramacciotti
    • 1
  • V. Camilleri
    • 1
  • S. Banti
    • 1
  • C. Borri
    • 1
  • C. Rambelli
    • 1
  • M. S. Montagnani
    • 1
  • S. Cortopassi
    • 1
  • A. Bettini
    • 1
  • S. Ricciardulli
    • 1
  • S. Montaresi
    • 1
  • P. Rucci
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. T. Beck
    • 3
  • G. B. Cassano
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Neurobiology, Pharmacology and Biotechnology, School of MedicineUniversity of PisaPisaItaly
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Pittsburgh School of MedicinePittsburghUSA
  3. 3.School of NursingUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA

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