Mental health care preferences among low-income and minority women

Original contribution

DOI: 10.1007/s00737-008-0002-0

Cite this article as:
Nadeem, E., Lange, J.M. & Miranda, J. Arch Womens Ment Health (2008) 11: 93. doi:10.1007/s00737-008-0002-0

Abstract

Mental health care preferences are examined among 1,893 low-income immigrant and U.S.-born women with an acknowledged emotional problem (mean age = 29.1, SD = 89.6). Ethnicity, depression, somatization, and stigma are examined as they relate to mental health care preferences (medication, individual and group counseling, faith, family/friends). Seventy-eight percent of participants counseling would be helpful; 55%; group counseling; and 32% medication. Faith was cited by 81%; family and friends were endorsed by 65%. Minorities had lower odds than Whites of endorsing medication (Black immigrants: OR = 0.27, p < 0.001, U.S.-born Blacks: OR = 0.30, p < 0.001, immigrant Latinas: OR = 0.50, p < 0.01). Most minorities also had higher odds of endorsing faith compared to Whites (Black immigrants: OR = 3.62, p < 0.001; U.S.-born Blacks, OR = 3.85, p < 0.001; immigrant Latinas: OR = 9.76, p < 0.001). Being depressed was positively associated with endorsing medication (OR = 1.93, p < 0.001), individual counseling (OR = 2.66, p < 0.001), and group counseling (OR = 1.35, p < 0.01). Somatization was positively associated with endorsing medication (OR = 1.29, p < 0.05) and faith (OR = 1.37, p < 0.05). Stigma-concerns reduced the odds of endorsing group counseling (OR = 0.58, p < 0.001). Finally, being in mental health treatment was related to increased odds of endorsing medication (OR = 3.88, p < 0.001) and individual counseling (OR = 2.29, p = 0.001).

Keywords

Minority women Depression Treatment preferences Stigma 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erum Nadeem
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Jane M. Lange
    • 4
  • Jeanne Miranda
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Health Services, School of Public HealthUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Health Services Research CenterUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral SciencesUniversity of California, Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  4. 4.Department of BiostatisticsUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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