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Amino Acids

, Volume 34, Issue 4, pp 547–554 | Cite as

The effects of 10 weeks of resistance training combined with β-alanine supplementation on whole body strength, force production, muscular endurance and body composition

  • Iain P. Kendrick
  • Roger C. Harris
  • Hyo Jeong Kim
  • Chang Keun Kim
  • Viet H. Dang
  • Thanh Q. Lam
  • Toai T. Bui
  • Marcus Smith
  • John A. Wise
Original Article

Abstract

Carnosine (Carn) occurs in high concentrations in skeletal muscle is a potent physico-chemical buffer of H+ over the physiological range. Recent research has demonstrated that 6.4 g.day−1 of β-alanine (β-ala) can significantly increase skeletal muscle Carn concentrations (M-[Carn]) whilst the resultant change in buffering capacity has been shown to be paralleled by significant improvements in anaerobic and aerobic measures of exercise performance. Muscle carnosine increase has also been linked to increased work done during resistance training. Prior research has suggested that strength training may also increase M-[Carn] although this is disputed by other studies. The aim of this investigation is to assess the effect of 10 weeks resistance training on M-[Carn], and, secondly, to investigate if increased M-[Carn] brought about through β-ala supplementation had a positive effect on training responses. Twenty-six Vietnamese sports science students completed the study. The subjects completed a 10-week resistance-training program whilst consuming 6.4 g.day−1 of β-ala (β-ALG) or a matched dose of a placebo (PLG). Subjects were assessed prior to and after training for whole body strength, isokinetic force production, muscular endurance, body composition. β-Alanine supplemented subjects increased M-[Carn] by 12.81 ± 7.97 mmol.kg−1 dry muscle whilst there was no change in PLG subjects. There was no significant effect of β-ala supplementation on any of the exercise parameters measured, mass or % body fat. In conclusion, 10 weeks of resistance training alone did not change M-[Carn].

Keywords

Carnsoine Hydrogen ions Physico-bufferring 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Iain P. Kendrick
    • 1
  • Roger C. Harris
    • 1
  • Hyo Jeong Kim
    • 2
  • Chang Keun Kim
    • 2
  • Viet H. Dang
    • 3
  • Thanh Q. Lam
    • 3
  • Toai T. Bui
    • 3
  • Marcus Smith
    • 1
  • John A. Wise
    • 4
  1. 1.University of ChichesterChichesterUK
  2. 2.Korea National Sport UniversitySeoulKorea
  3. 3.National University of Physical Education and Sport Science IIHo Chi Minh CityVietnam
  4. 4.Natural Alternatives InternationalSan MarcosUSA

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