Protoplasma

, 232:11 | Cite as

Foliar water supply of tall trees: evidence for mucilage-facilitated moisture uptake from the atmosphere and the impact on pressure bomb measurements

  • D. Zimmermann
  • M. Westhoff
  • G. Zimmermann
  • P. Geßner
  • A. Gessner
  • L. H. Wegner
  • M. Rokitta
  • P. Ache
  • H. Schneider
  • J. A. Vásquez
  • W. Kruck
  • S. Shirley
  • P. Jakob
  • R. Hedrich
  • F.-W. Bentrup
  • E. Bamberg
  • U. Zimmermann
Article

Summary.

The water supply to leaves of 25 to 60 m tall trees (including high-salinity-tolerant ones) was studied. The filling status of the xylem vessels was determined by xylem sap extraction (using jet-discharge, gravity-discharge, and centrifugation) and by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of wood pieces. Simultaneously, pressure bomb experiments were performed along the entire trunk of the trees up to a height of 57 m. Clear-cut evidence was found that the balancing pressure (Pb) values of leafy twigs were dictated by the ambient relative humidity rather than by height. Refilling of xylem vessels of apical leaves (branches) obviously mainly occurred via moisture uptake from the atmosphere. These findings could be traced back to the hydration and rehydration of mucilage layers on the leaf surfaces and/or of epistomatal mucilage plugs. Xylem vessels also contained mucilage. Mucilage formation was apparently enforced by water stress. The observed mucilage-based foliar water uptake and humidity dependency of the Pb values are at variance with the cohesion–tension theory and with the hypothesis that Pb measurements yield information about the relationships between xylem pressure gradients and height.

Keywords: 1H nuclear magnetic resonance imaging; Pressure bomb; Mucilage; Cohesive water; Epistomatal plug; Reverse transpiration. 

Abbreviations:

CW

cohesive water

CT

theory cohesion–tension theory

MW

mobile water in xylem

XW

total water in xylem conduit

T

temperature

r.h.

relative humidity

Pb

balancing pressure

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Zimmermann
    • 1
  • M. Westhoff
    • 2
  • G. Zimmermann
    • 2
  • P. Geßner
    • 2
  • A. Gessner
    • 2
  • L. H. Wegner
    • 2
  • M. Rokitta
    • 3
  • P. Ache
    • 4
  • H. Schneider
    • 2
  • J. A. Vásquez
    • 5
    • 6
  • W. Kruck
    • 7
  • S. Shirley
    • 8
  • P. Jakob
    • 3
  • R. Hedrich
    • 4
  • F.-W. Bentrup
    • 9
  • E. Bamberg
    • 1
  • U. Zimmermann
    • 2
  1. 1.Abteilung für Biophysikalische ChemieMax-Planck-Institut für BiophysikFrankfurt am Main
  2. 2.Lehrstuhl für Biotechnologie, BiozentrumUniversität WürzburgWürzburg
  3. 3.Lehrstuhl für Experimentelle Physik VUniversität WürzburgWürzburg
  4. 4.Lehrstuhl für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie und Biophysik, Julius-von-Sachs-InstitutUniversität WürzburgWürzburg
  5. 5.Departamento Biología Marina, Facultad de Ciencias del MarUniversidad Catolica del NorteCoquimbo
  6. 6.Centro de Estudios Avanzados en Zonas AridasLa Serena
  7. 7.Bundesanstalt für Geowissenschaften und RohstoffeHannover
  8. 8.Abteilung Kryobiophysik und KryotechnologieFraunhofer-Institut für Biomedizinische TechnikSt. Ingbert
  9. 9.Abteilung für PflanzenphysiologieUniversität SalzburgSalzburg

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