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Archives of Virology

, Volume 147, Issue 10, pp 2039–2044 | Cite as

The family Closteroviridae revised

  • G.P. Martelli
  • A.A. Agranovsky
  • M. Bar-Joseph
  • D. Boscia
  • T. Candresse
  • R.H.A. Coutts
  • V.V. Dolja
  • B.W. Falk
  • D. Gonsalves
  • W. Jelkmann
  • A.V. Karasev
  • A. Minafra
  • S. Namba
  • H.J. Vetten
  • G.C. Wisler
  • N. Yoshikawa

Summary.

 Recently obtained molecular and biological information has prompted the revision of the taxonomic structure of the family Closteroviridae. In particular, mealybug-transmitted species have been separated from the genus Closterovirus and accommodated in a new genus named Ampelovirus (from ampelos, Greek for grapevine). Thus, the family now comprises three genera. Their major properties are (i) Closterovirus: type species Beet yellows virus, genome monopartite, 15.5–19.3 kb in size, a 22–25 kDa major coat protein (CP), the gene encoding the divergent CP analogue (CPd) upstream of the CP cistron, transmission by aphids, a membership of 8 definitive and 4 tentative species; (ii) Ampelo-virus: type species Grapevine leafroll virus 3, genome monopartite 16.9–19.5 kb in size, a 35–37 kDa major CP, a CPd cistron generally located downstream of the CP gene, transmission by pseudococcid and coccid mealybugs, a membership of 6 definitive and 5 tentative species; (iii) Crinivirus: type species Lettuce infectious yellows virus, genome essentially bipartite 15.3–19 kb in size, a 28–33 kDa CP, a CPd cistron downstream of the CP gene, transmission by whiteflies (Bemisia, Trialeurodes), a membership of 7 definitive and 3 tentative species. There are five unassigned species in the family.

Keywords

Coat Protein Biological Information Taxonomic Structure Unassigned Species 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • G.P. Martelli
    • 1
  • A.A. Agranovsky
    • 2
  • M. Bar-Joseph
    • 3
  • D. Boscia
    • 4
  • T. Candresse
    • 5
  • R.H.A. Coutts
    • 6
  • V.V. Dolja
    • 7
  • B.W. Falk
    • 8
  • D. Gonsalves
    • 9
  • W. Jelkmann
    • 10
  • A.V. Karasev
    • 11
  • A. Minafra
    • 12
  • S. Namba
    • 13
  • H.J. Vetten
    • 14
  • G.C. Wisler
    • 15
  • N. Yoshikawa
    • 16
  1. 1.Dipartimento Protezione Piante, University of Bari, ItalyIT
  2. 2.Laboratory of Physico-Chemical Biology, Moscow State University, Moscow, RussiaRU
  3. 3.Volcani Agricultural Research Center, Bet Dagan, IsraelIL
  4. 4.Istituto Virologia Vegetale CNR, Sezione Bari, ItalyIT
  5. 5.Station de Pathologie Végétale, INRA, Villenave d’Ornon, FranceFR
  6. 6.Imperial College, London, U.K.GB
  7. 7.Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, U.S.A.US
  8. 8.Department of Plant Pathology, University of California, Davis, U.S.A.US
  9. 9.Pacific Basin Agricultural Research Center, USDA, Hilo, Hawaii, U.S.A.US
  10. 10.Institut für Pflanzenschutz im Obstbau, Dossenheim, GermanyDE
  11. 11.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Thomas Jefferson University, Doylestown, U.S.A.US
  12. 12.Istituto Virologia Vegetale CNR, Sezione Bari, ItalyIT
  13. 13.Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Sciences, University of Tokyo, JapanJP
  14. 14.Biologische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig, GermanyDE
  15. 15.Deparment of Plant Pathology, University of Florida, Gainesville, U.S.A.US
  16. 16.Iwate University, Morioka, JapanJP

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