Advertisement

Archives of Virology

, Volume 146, Issue 5, pp 1007–1020 | Cite as

Phenotypic recombination between bean common mosaic and bean common mosaic necrosis potyviruses in vivo

  • M. J. Silbernagel
  • G. I. Mink
  • R.-L. Zhao
  • G.-Y. Zheng

Summary.

 The US-5 strain of bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and the NL-8 strain of bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are both seedborne potyviruses in common bean (Phaseolus vulgarisL). They have contrasting and highly stable biological characteristics which are genetically controlled. BCMV strain US-5 belongs to pathogenicity group IV. BCMNV strain NL-8 belongs to pathogenicity group III. The two strains have contrasting serological characteristics: NL-8 is serotype A; US-5 is serotype B. When these two strains were maintained separately or as a mixture for more than three years (39 serial transfers) or in more than 100 plants of either of two susceptible hosts, we were unable to isolate a single virus strain that exhibited mutant-like or recombinant-like characteristics. However, within 28 days (during the 1st passage) after these 2 strains were inoculated to opposite primary leaves of bean plants that were susceptible to one virus and resistant to the other, we were able to recover 17 strains that clearly possessed recombinations of various phenotypic characteristics from each of the two „parental” viruses. Three types of phenotypic characteristics were recombined singly or in combination during a single passage in vivo: 1) Biological characteristics known to be controlled by genes for pathogenicity; 2) Serotype; and 3) Temperature-induced hypersensitive vascular necrosis. Each of the phenotypic recombinant strains contained only pathogenicity genes or serological characteristics found in one or both parents. In no case did we isolate a strain that could be described as a random mutation or one that contained pathogenicity or serological characteristics which were not found in at least one parent strain. This is the first known demonstration of phenotypic recombinations between distinct potyviruses in vivo [12, 17, 18]. Implications for the evolution of new virus strains through the use of resistant cultivars and its impact on breeding programs and bean seed production are discussed.

Keywords

Virus Strain Common Bean Phenotypic Characteristic Bean Plant Primary Leaf 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. J. Silbernagel
    • 1
  • G. I. Mink
    • 2
  • R.-L. Zhao
    • 3
  • G.-Y. Zheng
    • 3
  1. 1. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (retired) Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension Center, Prosser, Washington, U.S.A.US
  2. 2. Department of Plant Pathology, Washington State University (retired) Irrigated Agriculture Research and Extension Center, Prosser, Washington, U.S.A.US
  3. 3. Department of Biology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, People’s Republic of ChinaCN

Personalised recommendations