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Archives of Virology

, Volume 164, Issue 3, pp 853–860 | Cite as

Echovirus plays a major role in natural recombination in the coxsackievirus B group

  • Xufeng Pu
  • Yongjiang Qian
  • Yu Yu
  • Hongxing ShenEmail author
Brief Report

Abstract

Coxsakievirus (CV) B4, CVB5, and CVA9 belong to the species Enterovirus B. These viruses can cause viral encephalitis, aseptic meningitis, pancreatitis, flaccid paralysis, dilated myocarditis, and hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). In order to analyze the evolution of CVB4, CVB5, and CVA9, we analyzed all of the available genome sequences of Enterovirus B (EVB) isolates and found that there were 12 putative recombination events that produced CVB4, 13 putative recombination events that produced CVB5, and 10 putative recombination events that produced CVA9. These recombination events involved 17 EVB serotypes as major or minor parents. The most active Echovirus (EchoV) appears to have been involved in 20 of the 35 recombination events, acting as one of the parental viruses of circulating CVB4, CVB5, and CVA9 strains. Our study indicates that EchoV plays a major role in recombination in the CVB group, and Echov_E30 is the most active in CVB4, whereas Echov_E3 and Echov_E25 are the most active in CVA9.

Notes

Funding

This study was funded by the China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (2016M591790) and the Jiangsu Province Postdoctoral Science Foundation (1601072C).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Ethical approval

The research reported here did not involve experimentation with human participants or animals.

Supplementary material

705_2018_4114_MOESM1_ESM.docx (205 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 619 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Medical CollegeJiangsu UniversityZhenjiangPeople’s Republic of China

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