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Archives of Virology

, Volume 163, Issue 11, pp 3125–3130 | Cite as

Molecular analysis of Newcastle disease virus isolates reveals a novel XIId subgenotype in Vietnam

  • Xuyen Thi Kim Le
  • Huong Thi Thanh Doan
  • Thanh Hoa Le
Brief Report
  • 94 Downloads

Abstract

Eight Vietnamese Newcastle disease virus field isolates from 2008–2015 and 3 vaccine specimens were genotyped based on their full F gene sequences and compared to 80 reference strains representing all 18 genotypes. Three isolates formed a novel subgenotype XIId, identified for the first time in Vietnam; while the others clustered as follows: four in subgenotypes VIId and VIIh; two in Genotype I; and two in Genotype II. Evolutionary distance calculations confirmed the Vietnamese XIId isolates were distinct from XIIa and XIIb by 0.062–0.070; and from other genotypes by 0.089–0.245. This data demonstrated that a novel XIId subgenotype emerged in Vietnam indicating considerable genetic diversity, thus highlighting the need to implement antigenic matching during vaccination against NDVs.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research is funded by the Vietnam National Foundation for Science and Technology Development (NAFOSTED) under Grant number 106-NN.02-2013.37. We express our thanks to our provincial veterinary colleagues for helping us in the collection of viral samples during our research. We extend our thanks to Peter Krell of Guelph University (Canada), for the invaluable review of the manuscript.

Funding

This research is funded by Vietnam National Foundation for Science and Technology Development (NAFOSTED) under Grant number 106-NN.02-2013.37.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare no competing interests.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Immunology Department, Institute of BiotechnologyVietnam Academy of Science and TechnologyHanoiVietnam

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