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Archives of Virology

, Volume 163, Issue 10, pp 2799–2804 | Cite as

Phylogenetic analysis of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates from Northern Ireland

  • Natalie Smith
  • Ultan F. Power
  • John McKillen
Brief Report
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Abstract

To investigate the genetic diversity of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) in Northern Ireland, the ORF5 gene from nine field isolates was sequenced and phylogenetically analysed. The results revealed relatively high diversity amongst isolates, with 87.6-92.2% identity between farms at the nucleotide level and 84.1-93.5% identity at the protein level. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that all nine isolates belonged to the European (type 1) genotype and formed a cluster within the subtype 1 subgroup. This study provides the first report on PRRSV isolate diversity in Northern Ireland.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to thank the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) for funding this study.

Funding

This study was part of a Ph.D. studentship funded by the Department of Agriculture, Environment and Rural Affairs (DAERA) for Northern Ireland.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

All of the authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Natalie Smith
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ultan F. Power
    • 2
  • John McKillen
    • 1
  1. 1.Veterinary Science DivisionAgri-Food and Biosciences InstituteBelfastUK
  2. 2.Centre for Experimental Medicine, School of Medicine, Dentistry and Biomedical SciencesMedical Biology Centre, Queen’s University BelfastBelfastUK

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