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Archives of Virology

, Volume 161, Issue 11, pp 3285–3289 | Cite as

Genetic and phylogenetic analysis of a novel parvovirus isolated from chickens in Guangxi, China

  • Bin Feng
  • Zhixun XieEmail author
  • Xianwen Deng
  • Liji Xie
  • Zhiqin Xie
  • Li Huang
  • Qin Fan
  • Sisi Luo
  • Jiaoling Huang
  • Yanfang Zhang
  • Tingting Zeng
  • Sheng Wang
  • Leyi Wang
Annotated Sequence Record

Abstract

A previously unidentified chicken parvovirus (ChPV) strain, associated with runting-stunting syndrome (RSS), is now endemic among chickens in China. To explore the genetic diversity of ChPV strains, we determined the first complete genome sequence of a novel ChPV isolate (GX-CH-PV-7) identified in chickens in Guang Xi, China, and showed moderate genome sequence similarity to reference strains. Analysis showed that the viral genome sequence is 86.4 %–93.9 % identical to those of other ChPVs. Genetic and phylogenetic analyses showed that this newly emergent GX-CH-PV-7 is closely related to Gallus gallus enteric parvovirus isolate ChPV 798 from the USA, indicating that they may share a common ancestor. The complete DNA sequence is 4612 bp long with an A+T content of 56.66 %. We determined the first complete genome sequence of a previously unidentified ChPV strain to elucidate its origin and evolutionary status.

Keywords

Muscovy Duck Chicken Flock Commercial Chicken Moderate Genome Sequence Healthy Flock 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We acknowledge and appreciate the excellent technical help provided by several staff in cities local to the Animal Disease Prevention and Control Center, Guangxi, for assistance with sample collection. This study was funded by the Guangxi Science and Technology Bureau (1222003-2-4) and the Guangxi Government Senior Scientist Foundation (2011B020) (Guangxi, China).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that we have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

This study was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) of the Guangxi Veterinary Research Institute. Briefly, all the chickens were given ad libitum access to feed and water. Tracheal and cloacal swab samples were gently collected from the live chickens as per IACUC protocol to minimize animal suffering.

Supplementary material

705_2016_2999_MOESM1_ESM.doc (38 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 38 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bin Feng
    • 1
  • Zhixun Xie
    • 1
    Email author
  • Xianwen Deng
    • 1
  • Liji Xie
    • 1
  • Zhiqin Xie
    • 1
  • Li Huang
    • 1
  • Qin Fan
    • 1
  • Sisi Luo
    • 1
  • Jiaoling Huang
    • 1
  • Yanfang Zhang
    • 1
  • Tingting Zeng
    • 1
  • Sheng Wang
    • 1
  • Leyi Wang
    • 2
  1. 1.Guangxi Key Laboratory of Animal Epidemic Etiology and DiagnosticGuangxi Veterinary Research InstituteNanningChina
  2. 2.Animal Disease Diagnostic LaboratoryOhio Department of AgricultureReynoldsburgUSA

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