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Archives of Virology

, Volume 161, Issue 9, pp 2407–2416 | Cite as

Isolation and characterization of a distinct duck-origin goose parvovirus causing an outbreak of duckling short beak and dwarfism syndrome in China

  • Shilong Chen
  • Shao Wang
  • Xiaoxia Cheng
  • Shifeng Xiao
  • Xiaoli Zhu
  • Fengqiang Lin
  • Nanyang Wu
  • Jinxiang Wang
  • Meiqing Huang
  • Min Zheng
  • Shaoying Chen
  • Fusong Yu
Original Article

Abstract

Many mule duck and Cherry Valley duck flocks in different duck-producing regions of China have shown signs of an apparently new disease designated “short beak and dwarfism syndrome” (SBDS) since 2015. The disease is characterized by dyspraxia, weight loss, a protruding tongue, and high morbidity and low mortality rates. In order to characterize the etiological agent, a virus designated SBDSV M15 was isolated from allantoic fluid of dead embryos following serial passage in duck embryos. This virus causes a cytopathic effect in duck embryo fibroblast (DEF) cells. Using monoclonal antibody diagnostic assays, the SBDSV M15 isolate was positive for the antigen of goose parvovirus but not Muscovy duck parvovirus. A 348-bp (2604-2951) VP1gene fragment was amplified, and its sequence indicated that the virus was most closely related to a Hungarian GPV strain that was also isolated from mule ducks with SBDS disease. A similar disease was reproduced by inoculating birds with SBDSV M15. Together, these data indicate that SBDSV M15 is a GPV-related parvovirus causing SBDS disease and that it is divergent from classical GPV isolates.

Keywords

Latex Agglutination Allantoic Fluid Muscovy Duck Blind Passage Duck Embryo 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Funding

This study was funded by grants from the Natural Science Foundation of China (U1305212, 31402236), the Youth Elite Project of Fujian Academy of Agriculture Science (YC2016-1), the Fujian Public Welfare Project (2014R1023-1), the Fujian Major Platform of Livestock and Poultry Disease Prevention and Control Technology (2014N2003) and the National Waterfowl Industry and Technology System of China (CARS-43-01A).

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

The animal protocol used in this study was approved by the Research Ethics Committee of the Institute of Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Medicine, Fujian Academy of Agriculture Sciences. All experimental procedures involving ducks were performed in accordance with the Regulations of the Administration of Affairs Concerning Experimental Animals, approved by the State Council of China.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shilong Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shao Wang
    • 1
  • Xiaoxia Cheng
    • 1
  • Shifeng Xiao
    • 1
  • Xiaoli Zhu
    • 1
  • Fengqiang Lin
    • 1
  • Nanyang Wu
    • 1
  • Jinxiang Wang
    • 1
  • Meiqing Huang
    • 1
  • Min Zheng
    • 1
  • Shaoying Chen
    • 1
  • Fusong Yu
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Animal Husbandry and Veterinary MedicineFujian Academy of Agriculture SciencesFuzhouChina
  2. 2.College of Life SciencesFujian Agriculture and Forestry UniversityFuzhouChina
  3. 3.Institute of BiotechnologyFujian Academy of Agricultural SciencesFuzhouChina

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