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Archives of Virology

, Volume 161, Issue 7, pp 1883–1890 | Cite as

Antiviral activity of recombinant porcine surfactant protein A against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in vitro

  • Lan Li
  • Qisheng Zheng
  • Yuanpeng Zhang
  • Pengcheng Li
  • Yanfeng Fu
  • Jibo Hou
  • Xilong Xiao
Original Article

Abstract

Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has caused significant economic losses in the swine industry worldwide. However, there is not an ideal vaccine to provide complete protection against PRRSV. Thus, the need for new antiviral strategies to control PRRSV still remains. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) belongs to the family of C-type lectins, which can exert antiviral activities. In this present study, we assessed the antiviral properties of recombinant porcine SP-A (RpSP-A) on PRRSV infection in Marc 145 cells and revealed its antiviral mechanism using a plaque assay, real-time qPCR, western blotting analysis and an attachment and penetration assay. Our results showed that RpSP-A could inhibit the infectivity of PRRSV in Marc 145 cells and could reduce the total RNA and protein level. The attachment assay indicated that RpSP-A in the presence of Ca2+ could largely inhibit Marc 145 cell attachment; however, in the penetration assay, it was relatively inactive. Furthermore, our study suggested that virus progeny released from infected Marc145 cells were blocked by RpSP-A from infecting other cells. We conclude that RpSP-A has antiviral activity against PRRSV, most probably by blocking viral attachment and the cell-to-cell transmission pathway, and therefore, RpSP-A holds promise as a novel antiviral agent against PRRSV.

Keywords

Bufalin Penetration Assay Human Seasonal H1N1 Hippeastrum Hybrid Agglutinin Flavaspidic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by grants from the Special Fund for Agro-Scientific Research in the Public Interest (No. 201303046) and the Independent Innovation of Agricultural Sciences Program of Jiangsu Province (No. cx (14)2089).

Compliance with ethical standards

Funding

This study was supported by grants from the Special Fund for Agro-Scientific Research in the Public Interest (No. 201303046) and the Independent Innovation of Agricultural Sciences Program of Jiangsu Province (No. cx (14)2089).

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants or animals performed by any of the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.College of Veterinary MedicineChina Agricultural UniversityBeijingPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.National Research Center of Engineering and Technology for Veterinary BiologicalsJiangsu Academy of Agricultural SciencesNanjingPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Institute of Animal ScienceJiangsu Academy of Agricultural SciencesNanjingPeople’s Republic of China

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