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Archives of Virology

, Volume 160, Issue 8, pp 2111–2115 | Cite as

Evidence for natural recombination in the capsid gene VP2 of Taiwanese goose parvovirus

  • Shao Wang
  • Xiaoxia Cheng
  • Shaoying Chen
  • Fengqiang Lin
  • Shilong Chen
  • Xiaoli Zhu
  • Jingxiang Wang
Brief Report

Abstract

To investigate the possible role of recombination in the evolution of Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) and goose parvovirus (GPV) in Taiwan, we analyzed a potentially significant recombination event that occurred only in GPV by comparing thirteen complete sequences of the capsid gene VP2 of GPV and MDPV. The recombination event occurred between GPV strain 06-0239 as the minor parent and strains 99-0808 as the major parent, which resulted in the GPV recombinant V325/TW03. GPV V325/TW03 is likely to represent a new genotype among the Taiwanese GPV strains. This represents the first evidence that intergenotype recombination within the VP2 gene cluster contributes to the genetic diversity of the VP2 genes of Taiwanese GPV field strains.

Keywords

Goose parvovirus VP2 gene Recombination 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by grants from the National Waterfowl Industry and Technology System of China (CARS-43-01A), from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1305212, 31402236), from the Fujian Youth Elite Project (YC2015-18), and from the Fujian Public Welfare Project (2014R1023-1), China.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shao Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaoxia Cheng
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shaoying Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Fengqiang Lin
    • 1
    • 2
  • Shilong Chen
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaoli Zhu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Jingxiang Wang
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of Animal Husbandry and Veterinary MedicineFujian Academy of Agriculture SciencesFuzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Fujian Animal Diseases Control Technology Development CenterFuzhouPeople’s Republic of China

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