Archives of Virology

, Volume 159, Issue 12, pp 3421–3426 | Cite as

Molecular characterization of yam virus X, a new potexvirus infecting yams (Dioscorea spp) and evidence for the existence of at least three distinct potexviruses infecting yams

  • Isabelle Acina Mambole
  • Lydiane Bonheur
  • Laurence Svanella Dumas
  • Denis Filloux
  • Rose-Marie Gomez
  • Chantal Faure
  • David Lange
  • Fabiola Anzala
  • Claudie Pavis
  • Armelle Marais
  • Philippe Roumagnac
  • Thierry Candresse
  • Pierre-Yves Teycheney
Brief Report

Abstract

The genome of yam virus X (YVX), a new member of the genus Potexvirus from yam (Dioscorea trifida), was completely sequenced. Structural and phylogenetic analysis showed that the closest relative of YVX is nerine virus X. A prevalence study found YVX only in plants maintained in Guadeloupe and showed that it also infects members of the complex D. cayenensis rotundata. This study provides evidence for the existence of two additional potexviruses, one of which infects D. nummularia in Vanuatu and the other, D. bulbifera and D. rotundata in Haiti and D. trifida and D. rotundata in Guadeloupe. This work also shows that existing potexvirus-specific degenerate primers targeting the ORF1-encoded polymerase domain are well suited for the identification of the three potexviruses reported here.

Keywords

Diosgenin Amino Acid Sequence Homology Triple Gene Block Steroidal Sapogenin Herbaceous Host 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was funded by the European Regional Development Fund, the Guadeloupe Region and the Agence Nationale de la Recherche through project SafePGR. Authors wish to thank ARCAD Foundation for access to unpublished yam EST sequences, and CRB-PT for supplying yam accessions.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Isabelle Acina Mambole
    • 1
  • Lydiane Bonheur
    • 1
  • Laurence Svanella Dumas
    • 2
  • Denis Filloux
    • 3
  • Rose-Marie Gomez
    • 4
  • Chantal Faure
    • 2
  • David Lange
    • 4
  • Fabiola Anzala
    • 1
  • Claudie Pavis
    • 4
  • Armelle Marais
    • 2
  • Philippe Roumagnac
    • 3
  • Thierry Candresse
    • 2
  • Pierre-Yves Teycheney
    • 1
  1. 1.CIRADUMR AGAPCapesterre-Belle Eau (Guadeloupe)France
  2. 2.INRA, UMR 1332 Biologie du Fruit et Pathologie, CS 20032Villenave d’Ornon CedexFrance
  3. 3.CIRAD UMR BGPIMontpellier Cedex 5France
  4. 4.INRA, UR1321 ASTRO Agrosystèmes tropicauxPetit-Bourg (Guadeloupe)France

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