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Archives of Virology

, Volume 159, Issue 6, pp 1393–1401 | Cite as

Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in esophageal and cervical cancers in the high incidence area for the two diseases from 2007 to 2009 in Linzhou of Henan Province, Northern China

  • Hong Yan Liu
  • Sheng Li Zhou
  • Jian Wei Ku
  • Dong Yun Zhang
  • Bei Li
  • Xue Na Han
  • Zong Min Fan
  • Ji Li Cui
  • Hong Li Lin
  • Er Tao Guo
  • Xi Chen
  • Yuan Yuan
  • Jing Jing Han
  • Wei Zhang
  • Lian Qun Zhang
  • Fu You Zhou
  • Shi Xiu Liao
  • Jun Yan Hong
  • Li Dong WangEmail author
Original Article

Abstract

The etiological role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical cancer has been well established. However, it is inconclusive whether HPV plays the same role in esophageal carcinogenesis. In this study, we detected HPV infection in 145 frozen esophageal tissues, including 30 normal epithelium (ENOR), 37 dysplasia (DYS) and 78 invasive squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), and in 143 frozen cervical tissues composed of 30 normal epithelium (CNOR), 38 intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and 75 invasive squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC). The patients and symptom-free subjects enrolled in this study were from a high-incidence area for both ESCC and CSCC, Linzhou City, Northern China, from 2007 to 2009. The HPV infection analysis was conducted by using an HPV GenoArray Test Kit. We found that the high-risk HPV types accounted for more than 90 % of the HPV-positive lesions of esophagus and cervix tissues. The prevalence of high-risk HPV types increased significantly during the progression of both esophageal and cervical carcinogenesis (positive rate in esophageal tissues: 33 % ENOR, 70 % in DYS and 69 % in ESCC; positive rate in cervical tissues: 27 % in CNOR, 82 % in CIN and 88 % in CSCC; P < 0.001, respectively). Infection with the high-risk HPV types increased the risk for both DYS and ESCC by 4-fold (DYS vs. ENOR: OR = 4.73, 95 %CI = 1.68-13.32; ESCC vs. ENOR: OR = 4.50, 95 %CI = 1.83-11.05) and increased the risk for both CIN and CSCC by 12-fold and 20-fold (CIN vs. CNOR: OR = 12.18, 95 %CI = 3.85-38.55; CSCC vs. CNOR: OR = 20.17, 95 %CI = 6.93-58.65), respectively. The prevalence of high-risk types in ESCC patients was lower than that in CSCC patients (P = 0.005) and was significantly associated with the degree of ESCC tumor infiltration (P = 0.001). HPV 16 was the most prevalent subtype in both esophageal and cervical tissues. Single HPV infection increased significantly along with the progression of ESCC and maintained a high level in cervical tissues, regardless of whether they were CNOR or CSCC tissues. Our results showed that infection with HPV, especially the high-risk types, was positively associated with both esophageal and cervical cancers, suggesting that HPV also plays a role in the etiology of ESCC in the high-incidence area.

Keywords

Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Patient Cervical Tissue Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma Tissue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

BCH

Basal cell hyperplasia

CIN

Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

CIS

Carcinoma in situ

CNOR

Cervical normal

CSCC

Cervical squamous cell carcinoma

DYS

Dysplasia

ENOR

Esophageal normal

ESCC

Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

HPV

Human papillomavirus

PCR

Polymerase chain reaction

SCC

Squamous cell carcinoma

Notes

Acknowledgments

This project was funded by The 863 HighTech Key Projects (2012AA02A053, 2012AA02A209 and 2012AA02A201) and National Natural Science Foundation (81071783 and 30971133).

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hong Yan Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sheng Li Zhou
    • 2
  • Jian Wei Ku
    • 2
    • 3
  • Dong Yun Zhang
    • 2
  • Bei Li
    • 2
  • Xue Na Han
    • 2
  • Zong Min Fan
    • 2
  • Ji Li Cui
    • 4
  • Hong Li Lin
    • 4
  • Er Tao Guo
    • 2
  • Xi Chen
    • 2
  • Yuan Yuan
    • 2
    • 5
  • Jing Jing Han
    • 2
  • Wei Zhang
    • 2
  • Lian Qun Zhang
    • 2
    • 5
  • Fu You Zhou
    • 5
  • Shi Xiu Liao
    • 1
  • Jun Yan Hong
    • 6
  • Li Dong Wang
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Henan Medical Genetics InstitutePeople’s Hospital of Zhengzhou University (Henan Provincial People’s Hospital)ZhengzhouChina
  2. 2.Henan Key Laboratory for Esophageal Cancer ResearchThe First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou UniversityZhengzhouChina
  3. 3.Departments of Medical OncologyThe Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanyang Medical CollegeNanyangChina
  4. 4.Cancer Research CenterXinxiang Medical UniversityXinxiangChina
  5. 5.Departments of Thoracic Surgery and GastroenterologyAnyang Tumor HospitalAnyangChina
  6. 6.School of Public HealthRutgers UniversityNew BrunswickUSA

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