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Archives of Virology

, Volume 155, Issue 3, pp 429–433 | Cite as

The complete genome sequence of the Tanzanian strain of Cassava brown streak virus and comparison with the Ugandan strain sequence

  • Wendy A. MongerEmail author
  • T. Alicai
  • J. Ndunguru
  • Z. M. Kinyua
  • M. Potts
  • R. H. Reeder
  • D. W. Miano
  • I. P. Adams
  • N. Boonham
  • R. H. Glover
  • J. Smith
Annotated Sequence Record

Abstract

The complete genome sequence for an isolate of the Ugandan and Tanzanian strain types of Cassava brown streak virus have been determined using the novel approach of non-directed next generation sequencing. Comparison of the genome sequences revealed that CBSV is highly heterogeneous at the isolate level as well as the strain level. The isolate of the Ugandan strain was found to have a genome 9,070 nucleotides long coding for a polypeptide with 2,902 amino acid residues. The isolate of the Tanzanian strain was 9,008 nucleotides long and coded for a polypeptide with 2,916 amino acid residues. Nucleotide identity between the isolates across the genome was 76%, with protein encoding regions 57–77% and individual proteins had 65–91% amino acid similarity. In addition between the two strains four protein products (PIPO, CI, NIa-Vpg and coat protein) varied in size and an unusual HAM1-like protein, whilst of identical nucleotide length, was found to have the lowest homology. The implication of diversity of CBSV is discussed in the context of speciation, evolution, development of diagnostics, and breeding for resistance.

Keywords

Sanger Sequencing Protein Code Region Pyrosequencing Data Species Demarcation Criterion Cassava Brown Streak Virus 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to acknowledge financial support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and thank the numerous individuals involved in the Great Lakes Cassava Initiative, from which some of the infected cassava material reported in this paper was obtained. We also wish to thank Dr M. N. Maruthi (NRI, Greenwich University, UK) for providing additional positive material against which findings could be checked.

Supplementary material

705_2009_581_MOESM1_ESM.doc (31 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 31 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wendy A. Monger
    • 1
    Email author
  • T. Alicai
    • 2
  • J. Ndunguru
    • 3
  • Z. M. Kinyua
    • 4
  • M. Potts
    • 5
  • R. H. Reeder
    • 6
  • D. W. Miano
    • 4
  • I. P. Adams
    • 1
  • N. Boonham
    • 1
  • R. H. Glover
    • 1
  • J. Smith
    • 1
  1. 1.The Food and Environment Research AgencySand HuttonUK
  2. 2.National Crops Resources Research InstituteKampalaUganda
  3. 3.Mikocheni Agricultural Research InstituteDar es SalaamTanzania
  4. 4.Kenya Agricultural Research InstituteNairobiKenya
  5. 5.East Africa Regional OfficeNairobiKenya
  6. 6.Global Plant Clinic, CABI BioscienceEghamUK

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