Archives of Virology

, Volume 154, Issue 7, pp 1189–1193 | Cite as

Suggestions for a nomenclature of endogenous pararetroviral sequences in plants

Virology Division News

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors thank M.A. Grandbastien for valuable comments on the manuscript and R. Hull for helpful advice in defining a threshold level for sequence comparisons.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Plant Molecular BiologyBiocentre, University of Frankfurt am MainFrankfurt am MainGermany
  2. 2.Julius Kühn-Institut (JKI), Federal Research Centre for Cultivated PlantsInstitute for Epidemiology and Pathogen DiagnosticsBraunschweigGermany
  3. 3.CIRADUMR BGPI-TA A54/KMontpellier Cedex 5France
  4. 4.Department of Plant PathologyUniversity of MinnesotaSt. PaulUSA
  5. 5.Botanical InstituteUniversity of BaselBaselSwitzerland

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