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Archives of Virology

, Volume 153, Issue 11, pp 2139–2144 | Cite as

Distribution of various types and P25 subtypes of Beet necrotic yellow vein virus in Germany and other European countries

  • R. Koenig
  • U. Kastirr
  • B. Holtschulte
  • G. Deml
  • M. Varrelmann
Brief Report

Abstract

The distribution of various Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV) genotypes was studied using beet samples received from Germany and neighbouring countries. Almost exclusively B type BNYVV was detected in Germany, whereas in neighbouring countries BNYVV A types with different compositions of the amino acid tetrad in positions 67–70 of the RNA-3-encoded P25 are widely distributed. Neither A types nor the P type have been able to become established in Germany in the past decades, although there must have been many opportunities for their introduction from neighbouring countries. In one field, however, an RNA-5-containing BNYVV genotype closely resembling the Chinese isolate Har4 was found.

Keywords

Sugar Beet Beet Necrotic Yellow Vein Virus Sugar Beet Variety Beet Sample Determine Amino Acid Sequence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are greatly indebted to Petra Lüddecke and Steffi Loss for excellent technical assistance and the Arbeitsgemeinschaft industrieller Forschungsvereinigungen (AiF Grant 14163 N72, GFP BR42/04) for financial support. Infected beets were kindly provided by Drs. G. Büttner, W. Herrenschwand, P. Hübner, K. Lindsten and F. Pferdmenges.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Koenig
    • 1
  • U. Kastirr
    • 2
  • B. Holtschulte
    • 3
  • G. Deml
    • 1
  • M. Varrelmann
    • 4
  1. 1.Julius Kühn-Institut, Bundesforschungsinstitut für Kulturpflanzen, Institut für Epidemiologie und PathogendiagnostikBraunschweigGermany
  2. 2.Julius Kühn-Institut, Bundesforschungsinstitut für Kulturpflanzen, Institut für Epidemiologie und PathogendiagnostikQuedlinburgGermany
  3. 3.KWS SAAT AGEinbeckGermany
  4. 4.Institut für Zuckerrübenforschung, Abteilung PhytomedizinGöttingenGermany

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