Archives of Virology

, Volume 153, Issue 9, pp 1685–1692 | Cite as

Potency of an inactivated avian influenza vaccine prepared from a non-pathogenic H5N1 reassortant virus generated between isolates from migratory ducks in Asia

  • Norikazu Isoda
  • Yoshihiro Sakoda
  • Noriko Kishida
  • Kosuke Soda
  • Saori Sakabe
  • Ryuichi Sakamoto
  • Takashi Imamura
  • Masashi Sakaguchi
  • Takashi Sasaki
  • Norihide Kokumai
  • Toshiaki Ohgitani
  • Kazue Saijo
  • Akira Sawata
  • Junko Hagiwara
  • Zhifeng Lin
  • Hiroshi Kida
Original Article

Abstract

A reassortant influenza virus, A/duck/Hokkaido/Vac-1/2004 (H5N1) (Dk/Vac-1/04), was generated between non-pathogenic avian influenza viruses isolated from migratory ducks in Asia. Dk/Vac-1/04 (H5N1) virus particles propagated in embryonated chicken eggs were inactivated with formalin and adjuvanted with mineral oil to form a water-in-oil emulsion. The resulting vaccine was injected intramuscularly into chickens. The chickens were challenged with either of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus strains A/chicken/Yamaguchi/7/2004 (H5N1) or A/swan/Mongolia/3/2005 (H5N1) at 21 days post-vaccination (p. v.), when the geometric mean serum HI titers of the birds was 64 with the challenge virus strains. The vaccinated chickens were protected from manifestation of disease signs upon challenge with either of the highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. However, challenge virus was recovered at low titers from the birds at 2 and 4 days post-challenge (p.c.). All 3 chickens challenged at 6 days p.v. died, whereas 3 chickens challenged at 8 days p.v. survived. These results indicate that the present vaccine confers clinical protection and reduction of virus shedding against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus challenge and should be useful as an optional tool in emergency cases.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norikazu Isoda
    • 1
  • Yoshihiro Sakoda
    • 1
  • Noriko Kishida
    • 1
    • 2
  • Kosuke Soda
    • 1
  • Saori Sakabe
    • 1
  • Ryuichi Sakamoto
    • 3
  • Takashi Imamura
    • 3
  • Masashi Sakaguchi
    • 3
  • Takashi Sasaki
    • 4
  • Norihide Kokumai
    • 4
  • Toshiaki Ohgitani
    • 4
  • Kazue Saijo
    • 5
  • Akira Sawata
    • 5
  • Junko Hagiwara
    • 6
  • Zhifeng Lin
    • 6
  • Hiroshi Kida
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of Microbiology, Department of Disease Control, Graduate School of Veterinary MedicineHokkaido UniversityHokkaidoJapan
  2. 2.Research Center for Zoonosis ControlHokkaido UniversityHokkaidoJapan
  3. 3.Division 2, Second Research DepartmentThe Chemo-Sero-Therapeutic Research InstituteKumamotoJapan
  4. 4.Avian Biologics DepartmentKyoto Biken Laboratories, IncKyotoJapan
  5. 5.Research Center for BiologicalsThe Kitasato InstituteSaitamaJapan
  6. 6.Research DepartmentNippon Institute for Biological ScienceTokyoJapan

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