Archives of Virology

, Volume 153, Issue 5, pp 849–854

Anamnestic antibody response after viral challenge in monkeys immunized with dengue 2 recombinant fusion proteins

  • Lidice Bernardo
  • Lisset Hermida
  • Jorge Martin
  • Mayling Alvarez
  • Irina Prado
  • Carlos López
  • Rafael Martínez
  • Rosmari Rodríguez-Roche
  • Aida Zulueta
  • Laura Lazo
  • Delfina Rosario
  • Gerardo Guillén
  • María G. Guzmán
Original Article

Abstract

The suitability of dengue 2 envelope domain III recombinant fusion proteins [(fusion (PD5) and insertion (PD3) variants)] for inducing functional antibodies and a protective immune response in nonhuman primates has been reported. However, the evaluation of the antibody response after immunization did not correlate with the protection data as measured by viremia detection. Here, we characterized the anamnestic immune response after viral challenge in monkeys immunized with the dengue 2 recombinant proteins in an attempt to define correlates of protection useful for vaccine studies. Monkeys immunized with PD5 (most protected group) exhibited an earlier increase in the anti-DENV-2 IgM response after challenge compared to control animals. Hemagglutination-inhibiting (HAI) antibodies were increased significantly earlier in PD5-immunized animals compared to those immunized with PD3. The fully protected monkeys showed the earliest HAI antibody response. These results underline the usefulness of the anamnestic antibody response for supporting protection data. The induction of an early HAI and IgM antibody response after challenge suggest a protective role against dengue virus (DENV) infection in monkeys, supporting their use as correlates of protection in vaccine studies.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lidice Bernardo
    • 1
  • Lisset Hermida
    • 2
  • Jorge Martin
    • 2
  • Mayling Alvarez
    • 1
  • Irina Prado
    • 1
  • Carlos López
    • 2
  • Rafael Martínez
    • 2
  • Rosmari Rodríguez-Roche
    • 1
  • Aida Zulueta
    • 2
  • Laura Lazo
    • 2
  • Delfina Rosario
    • 1
  • Gerardo Guillén
    • 2
  • María G. Guzmán
    • 1
  1. 1.PAHO/WHO Collaborating Center for Viral Diseases, Department of Virology“Pedro Kourí” Tropical Medicine Institute (IPK), Autopista Novia del Mediodía, km 6 ½HavanaCuba
  2. 2.Center for Genetic Engineering and BiotechnologyHavanaCuba

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