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Archives of Virology

, Volume 153, Issue 4, pp 759–762 | Cite as

Sequences of the smallest double-stranded RNAs associated with cherry chlorotic rusty spot and Amasya cherry diseases

  • L. Covelli
  • Z. Kozlakidis
  • F. Di Serio
  • A. Citir
  • S. Açıkgöz
  • C. Hernández
  • A. Ragozzino
  • R. H. A. Coutts
  • R. Flores
Annotated Sequence Record

Introduction

Cherry chlorotic rusty spot (CCRS) and Amasya cherry disease (ACD) are two disorders that affect cherry in Italy [1] and Turkey [2]. Both diseases have similar symptoms and are associated with a complex pattern of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs), absent from healthy-looking material [1]. The dsRNAs were presumed to have a viral origin, and their characterization showed that: (1) four comprise the genomic components of a member of a new tentative species of the genus Chrysovirus [3], (2) two comprise the genomic components of a member of a new tentative species of the genus Partitivirus [4], and (3) another four display their highest similarity with members of the family Totiviridae [5]. Because members of these three taxa typically infect fungi, and because microscopy observations have identified a fungus-like organism in the affected leaf tissues [6], these data support a fungal etiology for CCRS and ACD diseases. In addition to the ten large dsRNAs, PAGE analysis of...

Keywords

Terminal Region Penicillium Chrysogenum Genomic Component Extensive Identity EMBL Nucleotide Sequence Database 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgments

Work in the laboratories of R.F. and A.R. was partially supported by the Generalidad Valenciana (ACOMP07/268) of Spain and the Ministero delle Politiche Agricole e Forestali of Italy. L.C. received fellowships from the Marie Curie Program (EU) and from the Università Federico II (Napoli, Italy), and Z.K. a bursary from the Faculty of Natural Sciences, Imperial College (London, UK).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. Covelli
    • 1
    • 2
  • Z. Kozlakidis
    • 3
  • F. Di Serio
    • 4
  • A. Citir
    • 5
  • S. Açıkgöz
    • 6
  • C. Hernández
    • 1
  • A. Ragozzino
    • 2
  • R. H. A. Coutts
    • 3
  • R. Flores
    • 1
  1. 1.Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas (UPV-CSIC)Universidad Politécnica de ValenciaValenciaSpain
  2. 2.Dipartimento di Arboricoltura, Botanica e Patologia VegetaleUniversità di NapoliPorticiItaly
  3. 3.The Department of Life Sciences, Sir Alexander Fleming BuildingImperial College LondonLondonUK
  4. 4.Istituto di Virologia Vegetale del CNRBariItaly
  5. 5.Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Plant ProtectionNamik Kemal UniversityTekirdagTurkey
  6. 6.Faculty of Agriculture, Department of Plant PathologyAdnan Menderes UniversityAydinTurkey

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