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Theoretical and Applied Climatology

, Volume 70, Issue 1–4, pp 81–96 | Cite as

The surface energy balance of a snow cover: comparing measurements to two differentsimulation models

  • D. Gustafsson
  • M. Stähli
  • P.-E. Jansson

Summary

 We compared two one-dimensional simulation models for heat and water fluxes in the soil-snow-atmosphere system with respect to their mathematical formulations of the surface heat exchange and the snow pack evolution. They were chosen as examples of a simple one-layer snow model and a more detailed multiple-layer snow model (SNTHERM). The snow models were combined with the same one-dimensional model for the heat and water balance of the underlying soil (CoupModel). Data from an arable field in central Sweden (Marsta), covering two years (1997–1999) of soil temperature, snow depth and eddy-correlation measurements were successfully compared with the models. Conditions with a snow pack deeper or shallower than 10 cm and bare soil resulted in similar discrepancies. The simulated net radiation and sensible heat flux were in good agreement with that measured during snow-covered periods, except for situations with snowmelt when the downward sensible heat flux was overestimated by 10–20 Wm−2. The results showed that the uncertainties in parameter values were more important than the model formulation and that both models were useful in evaluating the limitations and uncertainties of the measurements.

Keywords

Heat Flux Soil Temperature Heat Exchange Snow Cover Pack Evolution 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag/Wien 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Gustafsson
    • 1
  • M. Stähli
    • 2
  • P.-E. Jansson
    • 1
  1. 1. Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, SwedenSE
  2. 2. Institute of Terrestrial Ecology, ETH Zürich, Schlieren, SwitzerlandCH

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