Journal of Neural Transmission

, Volume 120, Issue 2, pp 299–307

AbobotulinumtoxinA (Dysport) dosing in cervical dystonia: an exploratory analysis of two large open-label extension studies

  • Robert A. Hauser
  • Daniel Truong
  • Jean Hubble
  • Chandra Coleman
  • Jean-Luc Beffy
  • Stephen Chang
  • Philippe Picaut
Neurology and Preclinical Neurological Studies - Original Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00702-012-0872-1

Cite this article as:
Hauser, R.A., Truong, D., Hubble, J. et al. J Neural Transm (2013) 120: 299. doi:10.1007/s00702-012-0872-1

Abstract

Treatment with botulinum toxin-A is recommended as first-line treatment for cervical dystonia (CD). In clinical practice many factors appear to influence dose adjustment and the retreatment regimen; however, there is little information available in the literature regarding the evolution of dosing over treatment cycles. We report on two similarly designed, long-term, multicenter, open-label extension studies of Dysport for the treatment of CD, which followed 500 U fixed-dose placebo-controlled trials. Both studies specified a fixed 500 U dose for the first open-label treatment cycle, with dose adjustment in subsequent treatment cycles according to the clinical response. These analyses include 218 patients who entered the two studies; doses in the subsequent treatment cycles ranged between 250 and 1,000 U. During open-label treatment, all treatment cycles resulted in improvements in mean Toronto Western Spasmodic Torticollis Rating Scale (TWSTRS) total scores. However, increasing the dose of Dysport above the initial 500 U dose was not observed to result in an incremental improvement in response as measured by the TWSTRS. No individual patient characteristic was found to reliably predict the use of higher doses at each treatment cycle. Dysport was generally well tolerated with no major differences in the incidence of adverse events (AEs) observed with different doses. Dysphagia was considered an AE of special interest and dysphagia data from the open-label studies were combined with two Phase II studies. Analysis of this enhanced database indicates that unilateral injections of >150 U into the sternocleidomastoid muscle is associated with a higher dysphagia risk. Thus, limiting the dose in the sternocleidomastoid may help reduce the incidence of dysphagia.

Keywords

Botulinum toxin Cervical dystonia Dysport Dosing Treatment 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert A. Hauser
    • 1
  • Daniel Truong
    • 2
  • Jean Hubble
    • 3
  • Chandra Coleman
    • 3
  • Jean-Luc Beffy
    • 4
  • Stephen Chang
    • 3
  • Philippe Picaut
    • 4
  1. 1.Parkinson’s Disease and Movement Disorders Center, NPF Center of ExcellenceByrd Institute, University of South FloridaTampaUSA
  2. 2.The Parkinson’s and Movement Disorder InstituteFountain ValleyUSA
  3. 3.Ipsen USBasking RidgeUSA
  4. 4.IpsenLes Ulis CedexFrance

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