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Journal of Neural Transmission

, Volume 116, Issue 1, pp 97–104 | Cite as

Increased EEG power density in alpha and theta bands in adult ADHD patients

  • S. Koehler
  • P. Lauer
  • T. Schreppel
  • C. Jacob
  • M. Heine
  • A. Boreatti-Hümmer
  • A. J. Fallgatter
  • M. J. HerrmannEmail author
Biological Psychiatry - Original Article

Abstract

This study examined EEG abnormalities in adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We investigated EEG frequencies in 34 adults with ADHD and 34 control subjects. Two EEG readings were taken over 5 min intervals during an eyes-closed resting period with 21 electrodes placed in accordance with the international 10–20 system. Fourier transformation was performed to obtain absolute power density in delta, theta, alpha and beta frequency bands. The ADHD patients showed a significant increase of absolute power density in alpha and theta bands. No differences were found for beta activity. Our findings indicate that abnormalities in the EEG power spectrum of adults with ADHD are different than those described in children. Reliable discriminators between patients and healthy subjects in adulthood could be alpha and theta power density. Based on our results, we suggest further research involving longitudinal studies in ADHD patients to investigate the changes of EEG abnormalities with age.

Keywords

Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) Adults Quantitative EEG Power density 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Supported by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (KFO 125/1-1).

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Koehler
    • 1
  • P. Lauer
    • 1
  • T. Schreppel
    • 1
  • C. Jacob
    • 1
  • M. Heine
    • 1
  • A. Boreatti-Hümmer
    • 1
  • A. J. Fallgatter
    • 1
  • M. J. Herrmann
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Psychosomatics and PsychotherapyUniversity of WürzburgWuerzburgGermany

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