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Journal of Neural Transmission

, Volume 114, Issue 4, pp 427–430 | Cite as

Cocaine, but not amphetamine, short term treatment elevates the density of rat brain vesicular monoamine transporter 2

  • K. Schwartz
  • R. Nachman
  • M. Yossifoff
  • R. Sapir
  • A. Weizman
  • M. Rehavi
Short Communication

Summary

We compared the effect of 5 days D-amphetamine (5 mg/kg/day i.p.) and cocaine (15 mg/kg/day i.p.) administration on the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) density in rat brain. VMAT2 expression was assessed by [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine high affinity binding. Cocaine administration led to significant increases in VMAT2 density in both prefrontal cortex (+40%, p < 0.01) and striatum (+23%, p < 0.05), while amphetamine did not affect VMAT2 expression. The upregulation of VMAT2 may serve as compensatory mechanism aimed to enhance the vesicular monoamine storage capacity.

Keywords: Amphetamine, cocaine, vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), striatum, prefrontal cortex 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. Schwartz
    • 1
  • R. Nachman
    • 1
  • M. Yossifoff
    • 1
  • R. Sapir
    • 1
  • A. Weizman
    • 2
  • M. Rehavi
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sackler Faculty of MedicineTel-Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  2. 2.Geha Mental Health Center and Felsenstein Medical Research Center, Beilinson Campus, Petah Tikva and Sackler Faculty of MedicineTel-Aviv UniversityTel-AvivIsrael

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