Journal of Neural Transmission

, Volume 114, Issue 4, pp 417–421 | Cite as

Kynurenine in combination with probenecid mitigates the stimulation-induced increase of c-fos immunoreactivity of the rat caudal trigeminal nucleus in an experimental migraine model

  • E. Knyihár-Csillik
  • J. Toldi
  • A. Mihály
  • B. Krisztin-Péva
  • Z. Chadaide
  • H. Németh
  • R. Fenyő
  • L. Vécsei
Short Communication

Summary

Nitroglycerin, often used as a migraine model, results in increased number of c-fos immunoreactive secondary sensory neurons in the caudal trigeminal nucleus. Since synapses between first- and second-order trigeminal neurons are mediated by excitatory amino acids, NMDA receptors are presumably inhibited by kynurenic acid, the only known endogeneous NMDA receptor antagonist. Although kynurenic acid does not cross the BBB, its precursor, kynurenine, if combined with probenecid, crosses it readily. Systemic kynurenine + probenecid treatment significantly diminishes nitroglycerin-induced increase of c-fos immunoreactivity in the brainstem.

Keywords: Immunohistochemistry, c-fos, spinal trigeminal nucleus, nitroglycerin, kynurenine, probenecid 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Knyihár-Csillik
    • 1
  • J. Toldi
    • 2
  • A. Mihály
    • 3
  • B. Krisztin-Péva
    • 3
  • Z. Chadaide
    • 1
  • H. Németh
    • 2
  • R. Fenyő
    • 3
  • L. Vécsei
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Neurology, Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical and Pharmaceutical CenterUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary
  2. 2.Comparative Physiology, Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical and Pharmaceutical CenterUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary
  3. 3.Anatomy, Albert Szent-Györgyi Medical and Pharmaceutical CenterUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary
  4. 4.Neurology Research Group of the Hungarian, Academy of SciencesUniversity of SzegedSzegedHungary

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