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Journal of Neural Transmission

, Volume 113, Issue 12, pp 1837–1845 | Cite as

Carboxyl-terminal fragment of amyloid precursor protein and hydrogen peroxide induce neuronal cell death through different pathways

  • J. Sebastià
  • M. Pertusa
  • D. Vílchez
  • A. M. Planas
  • R. Verbeek
  • E. Rodríguez-Farré
  • R. Cristòfol
  • C. Sanfeliu
Article

Summary.

Carboxyl-terminal fragments (CTs) of the amyloid precursor protein have been shown to be highly neurotoxic and are though to contribute to the neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease. We compared the effects of expressing CT99 in the human neuroblastoma MC65 with the effects of hydrogen peroxide on the parental SK-N-MC cells. CT99 and hydrogen peroxide generated a different pattern of free radicals and their toxic effects were differentially protected by a battery of antioxidants. Hydrogen peroxide caused a cell cycle arrest at phase S and apoptosis mediated through caspase-3 activation in a pattern similar to that described for amyloid-β neurotoxicity. However, CT99 apoptosis appeared to be mediated through an unidentified mitochondrial pathway. Both oxidative injury types induced heme oxygenase-1 expression as a neuroprotective response. Overall we found a coincidence in the nonespecific stress oxidative effects of CT99 and hydrogen peroxide, but clear differences on their respective potencies and pathways of neurotoxicity.

Keywords: Carboxyl-terminal fragment of APP, hydrogen peroxide, oxidative stress, neurotoxicity, Alzheimer disease 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Sebastià
    • 1
  • M. Pertusa
    • 1
  • D. Vílchez
    • 1
  • A. M. Planas
    • 1
  • R. Verbeek
    • 1
  • E. Rodríguez-Farré
    • 1
  • R. Cristòfol
    • 1
  • C. Sanfeliu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology and ToxicologyIIBB, CSIC-IDIBAPSBarcelonaSpain

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