Skeletal muscle HSP72 and norepinephrine response to static magnetic field in rat

  • H. Abdelmelek
  • A. Molnar
  • S. Servais
  • J. M. Cottet-Emard
  • J. M. Pequignot
  • R. Favier
  • M. Sakly
Article

Summary.

The present work was undertaken in order to investigate the noradrenergic system and skeletal muscle heat shock protein 72 (HSP72) response to static magnetic field (MF) in male rats. At thermoneutrality (25°C), the exposition of rats 1 hour/day for 5 consecutive days to MF of 128 mT (m tesla) induced an increase in norepinephrine content in gastrocnemius muscle (+25%, p < 0.05) but had no effect at 67 mT (+1%, p > 0.05), indicating a stimulatory effect of sub-acute MF exposure on the noradrenergic system activity. Moreover, exposed rats to MF displayed a non-significant increase of HSP72 levels in gastrocnemius muscles (+29%, p > 0.05). The results indicate that noradrenergic systems in rat’s gastrocnemius muscles are affected by MF exposure. Interestingly, sub-acute exposure insufficiency increased HSP72 levels in gastrocnemius muscles.

Keywords: Magnetic field, heat shock protein 72, skeletal muscle, rat. 

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. Abdelmelek
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. Molnar
    • 1
  • S. Servais
    • 3
  • J. M. Cottet-Emard
    • 4
  • J. M. Pequignot
    • 2
  • R. Favier
    • 3
  • M. Sakly
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Physiologie Animale, Faculté des Sciences de BizerteJarzounaTunisia
  2. 2.Laboratoire de Physiologie Integrée, Cellulaires et Moléculaires UMR 5123VilleurbanneFrance
  3. 3.Laboratoire de Bioénergétique Fondamentale et Appliquée, EMI 0221-Université Joseph FourierGrenobleFrance
  4. 4.Laboratoire de Physiologie del’Environnement, Faculté de MédecineLyonFrance

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