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Acta Neurochirurgica

, Volume 156, Issue 4, pp 755–756 | Cite as

Letter to the editor: Duddy et al. repair of a large thoracolumbar myelomeningocele with associated lumbar kyphosis. October 2013, Volume 155, Issue 10, pp 1965-1968

  • Javier Marquez-Rivas
  • Mónica Rivero-Garvia
  • María José Mayorga-Buiza
  • Julio Valencia-Anguita
Letter to the editor - Pediatrics
  • 142 Downloads

Dear Editor, we have read with great interest the paper of Duddy et al. Repair of a large thoracolumbar myelomeningocele with associated lumbar kyphosis. October 2013, Volume 155, Issue 10, pp 1965-1968.

Approximately 10 % of infants born with severe myelomeningocele will also have a kyphotic deformity of the spine. Agressive kyphotic deformity occurs in 15 % of these children. The higher the neurological level, the higher the rate of spinal deformity at maturity, and for levels up T12, kyphosys is expected frequently [3]. But the mechanisms involved in the appearance of neonatal Kyphosis are not fully understood.

All neurosurgeons agree that emergent neurosurgical intervention is mandatory to close the defect and protect the CNS from bacterial invasion, free the spinal cord from cutaneous attachment and reconstruct the subarachnoid spaces. However, in the severe kyphotic deformity, there are controversies between authors who have approached this problem about the optimal time for...

Keywords

Chiari Malformation Shunt Infection Kyphotic Deformity Deep Wound Infection Excessive Blood Loss 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Conflicts of interest

None.

Funding statement

This research received no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors’

Contributorship statement

Conception and design: Márquez-Rivas

Acquisition of data and Initial drafting: Mayorga-Buiza, Rivero Garvia

Drafting and revision: All authors

Final approval: all authors

Ethical issues

The revision was approved by local investigation committee and informed consent was obtained for pictures, ensuring that identities have been omitted.

References

  1. 1.
    Arnell K (2006) Primary and secondary tissue expansion gives high quality skin and subcutaneous coverage in children with a large myelomeningocele and kyphosis. Acta Neurochir (Wien) 148(3):293–7CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Crawford AH, Strub WM, Lewis R, Gabriel KR, Billmire DA, Berger T, Crone K (2003) Neonatal kyphectomy in the patient with myelomeningocele. Spine 28(3):260–6PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Glard Y, Launay F, Viehweger E, Hamel A, Jouve JL, Bollini G (2007) Neurological classification in myelomeningocele as a spine deformity predictor. J Pediatr Orthop B 16(4):287–92PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Sarwark JF (1999) Kyphosis deformity in myelomeningocele. Orthop Clin N Am 30(3):451-5, viii-ixGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Wien 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Javier Marquez-Rivas
    • 1
    • 4
  • Mónica Rivero-Garvia
    • 1
  • María José Mayorga-Buiza
    • 2
  • Julio Valencia-Anguita
    • 3
  1. 1.Paediatric Neurosurgery SectionVirgen del Rocio and Virgen Macarena University HospitalSevilleSpain
  2. 2.Paediatric Anaesthesia SectionVirgen del Rocio and Virgen Macarena University HospitalSevilleSpain
  3. 3.Neurosurgical Spine SectionVirgen del Rocio and Virgen Macarena University HospitalSevilleSpain
  4. 4.Neurosurgery Service and Pediatric Neurosurgery SectionVirgen del Rocio and Virgen Macarena University HospitalSevilleSpain

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