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Specification of cloud topologies and orchestration using TOSCA: a survey

  • Julian BellendorfEmail author
  • Zoltán Ádám Mann
Article
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Abstract

Topology and Orchestration Specification for Cloud Applications (TOSCA) is an OASIS standard for specifying the topology of cloud applications, their deployment on physical or virtual cloud resources, and their orchestration. In recent years, the cloud research community has shown significant interest in TOSCA, leading to an increasing number of related publications. Such publications address a wide-ranging set of topics around TOSCA, e.g., devise sophisticated cloud orchestration methodologies using TOSCA, extend the language of TOSCA, or present tools for manipulating TOSCA models. To help researchers and practitioners overview this multifaceted area of research, this paper presents the results of a systematic survey of the relevant literature. We have processed over 120 papers and categorized them, leading to a taxonomy with 6 categories and 19 subcategories. The analysis of the results reveals several notable tendencies, as well as areas requiring future research.

Keywords

TOSCA Cloud computing Cloud topology Cloud orchestration 

Mathematics Subject Classification

68-02 68M01 68U35 68M11 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under Grant No. 731678 (RestAssured).

Supplementary material

607_2019_750_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (125 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (pdf 125 KB)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.paluno – The Ruhr Institute for Software TechnologyUniversity of Duisburg-EssenEssenGermany

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