Computing

, Volume 94, Issue 6, pp 521–539

Nanoinformatics: developing new computing applications for nanomedicine

  • Victor Maojo
  • Martin Fritts
  • Fernando Martin-Sanchez
  • Diana De la Iglesia
  • Raul E. Cachau
  • Miguel Garcia-Remesal
  • Jose Crespo
  • Joyce A. Mitchell
  • Alberto Anguita
  • Nathan Baker
  • Jose Maria Barreiro
  • Sonia E. Benitez
  • Guillermo De la Calle
  • Julio C. Facelli
  • Peter Ghazal
  • Antoine Geissbuhler
  • Fernando Gonzalez-Nilo
  • Norbert Graf
  • Pierre Grangeat
  • Isabel Hermosilla
  • Rada Hussein
  • Josipa Kern
  • Sabine Koch
  • Yannick Legre
  • Victoria Lopez-Alonso
  • Guillermo Lopez-Campos
  • Luciano Milanesi
  • Vassilis Moustakis
  • Cristian Munteanu
  • Paula Otero
  • Alejandro Pazos
  • David Perez-Rey
  • George Potamias
  • Ferran Sanz
  • Casimir Kulikowski
Open Access
Article

DOI: 10.1007/s00607-012-0191-2

Cite this article as:
Maojo, V., Fritts, M., Martin-Sanchez, F. et al. Computing (2012) 94: 521. doi:10.1007/s00607-012-0191-2

Abstract

Nanoinformatics has recently emerged to address the need of computing applications at the nano level. In this regard, the authors have participated in various initiatives to identify its concepts, foundations and challenges. While nanomaterials open up the possibility for developing new devices in many industrial and scientific areas, they also offer breakthrough perspectives for the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of diseases. In this paper, we analyze the different aspects of nanoinformatics and suggest five research topics to help catalyze new research and development in the area, particularly focused on nanomedicine. We also encompass the use of informatics to further the biological and clinical applications of basic research in nanoscience and nanotechnology, and the related concept of an extended “nanotype” to coalesce information related to nanoparticles. We suggest how nanoinformatics could accelerate developments in nanomedicine, similarly to what happened with the Human Genome and other -omics projects, on issues like exchanging modeling and simulation methods and tools, linking toxicity information to clinical and personal databases or developing new approaches for scientific ontologies, among many others.

Keywords

Nanoinformatics Computing Nanotechnology Bioinformatics Medical Informatics Nanomedicine 

Mathematics Subject Classification (2000)

68 92 

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Victor Maojo
    • 1
  • Martin Fritts
    • 2
  • Fernando Martin-Sanchez
    • 3
  • Diana De la Iglesia
    • 1
  • Raul E. Cachau
    • 4
  • Miguel Garcia-Remesal
    • 1
  • Jose Crespo
    • 1
  • Joyce A. Mitchell
    • 5
  • Alberto Anguita
    • 1
  • Nathan Baker
    • 6
  • Jose Maria Barreiro
    • 1
  • Sonia E. Benitez
    • 7
  • Guillermo De la Calle
    • 1
  • Julio C. Facelli
    • 5
  • Peter Ghazal
    • 8
  • Antoine Geissbuhler
    • 9
  • Fernando Gonzalez-Nilo
    • 10
  • Norbert Graf
    • 11
  • Pierre Grangeat
    • 12
  • Isabel Hermosilla
    • 13
  • Rada Hussein
    • 14
  • Josipa Kern
    • 15
  • Sabine Koch
    • 16
  • Yannick Legre
    • 17
  • Victoria Lopez-Alonso
    • 13
  • Guillermo Lopez-Campos
    • 13
  • Luciano Milanesi
    • 18
  • Vassilis Moustakis
    • 19
    • 20
  • Cristian Munteanu
    • 21
  • Paula Otero
    • 7
  • Alejandro Pazos
    • 21
  • David Perez-Rey
    • 1
  • George Potamias
    • 20
  • Ferran Sanz
    • 22
  • Casimir Kulikowski
    • 23
  1. 1.Biomedical Informatics Group, Departamento de Inteligencia Artificial, Faculdad de InformáticaUniversidad Politécnica de MadridMadridSpain
  2. 2.SAIC-Frederick Inc., National Cancer Institute at FrederickFrederickUSA
  3. 3.Health and Biomedical Informatics Research Laboratory Medical School-IBESThe University of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia
  4. 4.Advanced Biomedical Computing CenterNational Cancer Institute, SAIC-Frederick Inc.FrederickUSA
  5. 5.Biomedical Informatics DepartmentUniversity of UtahSalt Lake CityUSA
  6. 6.Pacific Northwest National LaboratoryRichlandUSA
  7. 7.Department of Medical InformaticsHospital Italiano de Buenos AiresBuenos AiresArgentina
  8. 8.Division of Pathway Medicine and Centre for Systems Biology EdinburghUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghUK
  9. 9.Division of Medical InformaticsUniversity Hospitals of GenevaGenevaSwitzerland
  10. 10.Center for Bioinformatics and Molecular SimulationUniversidad de TalcaTalcaChile
  11. 11.Department of Pediatric Oncology and HematologyUniversity of the SaarlandHomburgGermany
  12. 12.Laboratoire d’Electronique et de Technologie de l’Information (LETI), MINATEC CampusCommissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA)GrenobleFrance
  13. 13.Department of Medical BioinformaticsInstitute of Health “Carlos III”MadridSpain
  14. 14.Information Technology InstituteMinistry of Communications and Information TechnologyCairoEgypt
  15. 15.Department of Medical Statistics, Epidemiology and Medical Informatics, Andrija Stampar School of Public HealthZagreb University Medical SchoolZagrebCroatia
  16. 16.Health Informatics Centre, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and EthicsKarolinska InstitutetStockholmSweden
  17. 17.Health Grid OrganizationClermont-FerrandFrance
  18. 18.Institute of Biomedical TechnologyNational Research CouncilMilanItaly
  19. 19.Technical University of CreteChania, CreteGreece
  20. 20.Institute of Computer ScienceFORTH, Heraklion, CreteGreece
  21. 21.Department of Information and Communication TechnologiesUniversity of A CoruñaA CoruñaSpain
  22. 22.Biomedical Informatics Research Programme (GRIB), IMIMUniversitat Pompeu FabraBarcelonaSpain
  23. 23.Department of Computer Science, RutgersThe State University of New JerseyNewarkUSA

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