Plant Systematics and Evolution

, Volume 298, Issue 10, pp 1947–1959

Molecular evidence of hybridization in two native invasive species: Tithonia tubaeformis and T. rotundifolia (Asteraceae) in Mexico

  • Efraín Tovar-Sánchez
  • Fabiola Rodríguez-Carmona
  • Verónica Aguilar-Mendiola
  • Patricia Mussali-Galante
  • Alfredo López-Caamal
  • Leticia Valencia-Cuevas
Original Article

Abstract

The evolutionary genetics of invasive species has been relatively unexplored. Hybridization of invasive populations can generate novel genotypes, stimulating the colonization of new environments. A sunflower complex occurring in Mexico formed by two native invasive species, Tithonia tubaeformis and T. rotundifolia was analyzed with molecular markers (RAPDs) in five hybrid zones and two pure sites for each parental species. We tested if morphological atypical individuals between T. tubaeformis and T. rotundifolia that occur in sympatry are the result of hybridization between these two species, in which case genetic diversity in mixed stands would be higher in comparison with pure parental stands. Total DNA of 230 individuals was analyzed with 17 diagnostic markers and six species-specific markers. Molecular data support the hypothesis of hybridization and a bidirectional pattern of gene flow in this complex. Cluster analysis suggests that individuals from the same parental species were more similar among themselves than to putative hybrids, indicating occasional hybridization with segregation in hybrid types or backcrossing to parents. Hybrid populations had the highest levels of genetic diversity in comparison with nonmixed/allopatric populations of their putative parentals. We suggest that hybridization between invasive species may result in the creation of genotypes with an increased capacity for colonization of new habitats. Moreover, invasive species with incipient reproductive barriers may overlap with species of narrow distribution range and increase their possible hybridization rates.

Keywords

Annual species Genetic structure Hybridization Native invasive species Tithonia 

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Efraín Tovar-Sánchez
    • 1
  • Fabiola Rodríguez-Carmona
    • 1
  • Verónica Aguilar-Mendiola
    • 1
  • Patricia Mussali-Galante
    • 2
  • Alfredo López-Caamal
    • 1
  • Leticia Valencia-Cuevas
    • 1
  1. 1.Departamento de Sistemática y Evolución, Centro de Investigación en Biodiversidad y ConservaciónUniversidad Autónoma del Estado de MorelosCuernavacaMexico
  2. 2.Departamento de Medicina Genómica y Toxicología Ambiental, Instituto de Investigaciones BiomédicasUniversidad Nacional Autónoma de MéxicoMéxico, D.F.Mexico

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