Plant Systematics and Evolution

, Volume 298, Issue 2, pp 409–419 | Cite as

Two alleles of rpoB and rpoC1 distinguish an endemic European population from Cistus heterophyllus and its putative hybrid (C. × clausonis) with C. albidus

  • Marta Pawluczyk
  • Julia Weiss
  • María José Vicente-Colomer
  • Marcos Egea-Cortines
Original Article

Abstract

The genus Cistus is a widespread family growing around the Mediterranean area. There is a unique natural population of C. heterophyllus subsp. carthaginensis in Europe (Murcia, Spain) containing 22 individuals. Morphology of these plants suggests the co-occurrence of two distinct types within the population. One type would resemble C. heterophyllus, and a second type would be the result of hybridization events between this endangered population and the locally abundant Cistus albidus. These hybrids have been described in Africa as C. × clausonis. We have analyzed sequences of the chloroplast genes trnK-matK, rbcL, rpoB, rpoC1 and two intergenic regions, trnL-F and trnH-psbA. Surprisingly, we observed heteroplasmy for rpoB and rpoC1 genes in C. heterophyllus and the local C. × clausonis, but not in C. albidus or C. monspeliensis. We found two distinct alleles of rpoB, one present in all species and a second present only in C. heterophyllus and the local C. × clausonis. We also detected two alleles of rpoC1, one common to all species analyzed and a second present only in the local C. × clausonis. Our results show that there is a distinctive rpoB allele common to C. heterophyllus and C. × clausonis from Africa and Europe. The unique rpoC1 allele found in the local C. × clausonis indicates a different origin of this small population, indicating it is not a hybrid formed with the C. albidus or C. heterophyllus currently present in this location.

Keywords

Cistus × clausonis Cistus heterophyllus Heteroplasmy Hybridization Barcoding Plastid genome 

Supplementary material

606_2011_554_MOESM1_ESM.doc (1.3 mb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOC 1370 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marta Pawluczyk
    • 1
    • 2
  • Julia Weiss
    • 1
  • María José Vicente-Colomer
    • 2
  • Marcos Egea-Cortines
    • 1
  1. 1.Genetics, Agricultural Science and Technology Department, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería AgronómicaTechnical University of CartagenaCartagenaSpain
  2. 2.Plant Production Department, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería AgronómicaTechnical University of CartagenaCartagenaSpain

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