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Microchimica Acta

, Volume 177, Issue 1–2, pp 211–219 | Cite as

A nanoporous ruthenium oxide framework for amperometric sensing of glucose and potentiometric sensing of pH

  • Jun Ho Shim
  • Minkyung Kang
  • Youngmi LeeEmail author
  • Chongmok LeeEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Nanoporous ruthenium oxide frameworks (L2-eRuO) were electrodeposited on gold substrates by repetitive potential cycling in solutions of ruthenium(III) ions in the presence of reverse neutral micelles. The L2-eRuO was characterized in terms of direct oxidation of glucose and potentiometric response to pH values. The surface structures and morphologies of the L2-eRuO were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Their surface area was estimated via underpotential deposition of copper. L2-eRuO-modified electrodes showed a 17-fold higher sensitivity (40 μA mM−1 cm−2 towards glucose in 0–4 mM concentration in solution of pH 7.4) than a RuO electrode prepared in the absence of reverse micelles. Potential interferents such as ascorbic acid, 4-acetamidophenol, uric acid and dopamine displayed no effect. The new electrode also revealed improved potentiometric response to pH changes compared to a platinum electrode of the same type.

Figure

Nanoporous ruthenium oxide frameworks (L2-eRuO) were electrodeposited on gold substrates by repetitive potential cycling in solutions of ruthenium(III) ions in the presence of reverse neutral micelles. L2-eRuO-modified electrodes showed a 17-fold higher sensitivity than a RuO electrode prepared in the absence of reverse micelles. Potential interferents such as ascorbic acid, 4-acetamidophenol, uric acid and dopamine displayed no effect. The new electrode also revealed improved potentiometric response to pH changes compared to a platinum electrode of the same type.

Keywords

Nonenzymatic amperometric glucose sensor Nanoporous ruthenium structures Copper underpotential deposition Potentiometric pH sensing 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by Basic Reaserch Program through the National Reasearch Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2011–0009741). This work was also supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2011–0015619).

Supplementary material

604_2012_774_MOESM1_ESM.doc (46 kb)
Esm 1 (DOC 46.5 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Chemistry and Nano ScienceEwha Womans UniversitySeoulKorea
  2. 2.Department of ChemistryDaegu UniversityGyeongsanKorea

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