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Rock Mechanics and Rock Engineering

, Volume 46, Issue 1, pp 169–177 | Cite as

Critical Investigation of Wear Behaviour of WC Drill Bit Buttons

  • Anurag Gupta
  • Somnath Chattopadhyaya
  • Sergej HlochEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

Mining and petroleum drill bits are subjected to highly abrasive rock and high-velocity fluids that cause severe wear and erosion in service. To augment the rate of penetration and minimize the cost per foot, such drill bits are subjected to increasing rotary speeds and weight. A rotary/percussive drill typically hits the rock 50 times per second with hydraulic impact pressure of about 170–200 bar and feed pressure of about 90–100 bar, while rotating at 75–200 rpm. The drill rig delivers a high-velocity flow of drilling fluid onto the rock surface to dislodge cuttings and cool the bit. The impingement of high-velocity drilling fluid with entrained cuttings accelerates the erosion rate of the bit. Also, high service temperature contributes to softening of the rock for increased penetration. Hence, there is a need to optimize the drilling process and balance the wear rate and penetration rate simultaneously. This paper presents an experimental scanning electron microscopy (SEM) study of electroplated (nickel-bonded) diamond drills for different wear modes.

Keywords

Wear Drill bit buttons 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anurag Gupta
    • 1
  • Somnath Chattopadhyaya
    • 1
  • Sergej Hloch
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of ME and MMEIndian School of MinesDhanbadIndia
  2. 2.Faculty of Manufacturing TechnologiesTechnical University of Košice with a seat in PrešovPrešovSlovakia

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